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Influence of the Position of Artificial Boundary on Computation Accuracy of Conjugated Infinite Element for a Finite Length Cylindrical Shell

Influence of the Position of Artificial Boundary on Computation Accuracy of Conjugated Infinite... Structural finite element coupled with the conjugated infinite element method is an efficient numerical technique for solving the acoustic radiation problem due to the vibration of underwater objects. However, for large complex structures, the total acoustic mesh would become very large if the artificial boundary is too far away from the structural wetted surface. Thus, the calculation time can become too long to confine the application of the conjugated infinite element method. On the other hand, if the artificial boundary is close to the structural wetted surface, it will lead to computation accuracy losing due to the near-field effects. Consequently, it is essential to present some guidelines based on the physical mechanism of structural acoustics to choose a suitable artificial boundary that optimizes calculation accuracy and efficiency. In present work, the evanescent wave theory of an infinite length cylindrical shell is adopted to theoretically analyze the decay characteristic of evanescent waves in near field. Then, the effect of the position of artificial boundary on computation accuracy of conjugated infinite element for a finite length ring-stiffened cylindrical shell is numerically investigated. Results suggested that for the cylindrical shell mentioned in this study, the artificial boundary can be placed at least 0.4 times the acoustic wavelength away from the structural wetted surface. What’s more, for high frequencies or large-scale structures, the required non-dimensional distance between the artificial boundary and the structural wetted surface increases. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Acoustics Australia Springer Journals

Influence of the Position of Artificial Boundary on Computation Accuracy of Conjugated Infinite Element for a Finite Length Cylindrical Shell

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © Australian Acoustical Society 2020
ISSN
0814-6039
eISSN
1839-2571
DOI
10.1007/s40857-020-00175-5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Structural finite element coupled with the conjugated infinite element method is an efficient numerical technique for solving the acoustic radiation problem due to the vibration of underwater objects. However, for large complex structures, the total acoustic mesh would become very large if the artificial boundary is too far away from the structural wetted surface. Thus, the calculation time can become too long to confine the application of the conjugated infinite element method. On the other hand, if the artificial boundary is close to the structural wetted surface, it will lead to computation accuracy losing due to the near-field effects. Consequently, it is essential to present some guidelines based on the physical mechanism of structural acoustics to choose a suitable artificial boundary that optimizes calculation accuracy and efficiency. In present work, the evanescent wave theory of an infinite length cylindrical shell is adopted to theoretically analyze the decay characteristic of evanescent waves in near field. Then, the effect of the position of artificial boundary on computation accuracy of conjugated infinite element for a finite length ring-stiffened cylindrical shell is numerically investigated. Results suggested that for the cylindrical shell mentioned in this study, the artificial boundary can be placed at least 0.4 times the acoustic wavelength away from the structural wetted surface. What’s more, for high frequencies or large-scale structures, the required non-dimensional distance between the artificial boundary and the structural wetted surface increases.

Journal

Acoustics AustraliaSpringer Journals

Published: Aug 17, 2020

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