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Influence of milk fatty acid composition and process parameters on the quality of ice cream

Influence of milk fatty acid composition and process parameters on the quality of ice cream There has been considerable interest in recent years in altering the fatty acid composition of milk fat in dairy products to improve the long-term health of consumers. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of altering the fatty acid composition and varying two process parameters (homogenization pressure and ageing temperature) on the quality of ice cream. The quality of ice cream (8% fat) was monitored before and after heat shock by assessing fat droplet size, solvent extractable fat content, texture analysis, meltdown tests and sensory analyses. The results suggest that a high solid fat content and low homogenization pressure correlated well with large particles and high amounts of solvent extractable fat, which resulted in firm ice cream with slow melting behaviour and good structure retention. In contrast, ageing temperature did not significantly influence fat destabilization. Following heat shock, the results suggested that the hardness of ice cream was not determined by any of the parameters investigated, but was probably dominated by the amount of ice crystals. A good melting behaviour was retained after heat shock, provided that a strong matrix of destabilized fat was produced during the freezing process. Even though differences could be observed in hardness and melting behaviour for different milk fats or process conditions, these differences were hardly identified by trained sensory panels. These results suggest that high-quality ice cream can be produced with an altered fatty acid composition without any alteration in the conventional production process, provided that ice cream is stored and consumed under ideal circumstances. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Dairy Science & Technology Springer Journals

Influence of milk fatty acid composition and process parameters on the quality of ice cream

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 by Springer S+B Media B.V.
Subject
Chemistry; Food Science; Agriculture; Microbiology
ISSN
1958-5586
eISSN
1958-5594
DOI
10.1051/dst/2010006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

There has been considerable interest in recent years in altering the fatty acid composition of milk fat in dairy products to improve the long-term health of consumers. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of altering the fatty acid composition and varying two process parameters (homogenization pressure and ageing temperature) on the quality of ice cream. The quality of ice cream (8% fat) was monitored before and after heat shock by assessing fat droplet size, solvent extractable fat content, texture analysis, meltdown tests and sensory analyses. The results suggest that a high solid fat content and low homogenization pressure correlated well with large particles and high amounts of solvent extractable fat, which resulted in firm ice cream with slow melting behaviour and good structure retention. In contrast, ageing temperature did not significantly influence fat destabilization. Following heat shock, the results suggested that the hardness of ice cream was not determined by any of the parameters investigated, but was probably dominated by the amount of ice crystals. A good melting behaviour was retained after heat shock, provided that a strong matrix of destabilized fat was produced during the freezing process. Even though differences could be observed in hardness and melting behaviour for different milk fats or process conditions, these differences were hardly identified by trained sensory panels. These results suggest that high-quality ice cream can be produced with an altered fatty acid composition without any alteration in the conventional production process, provided that ice cream is stored and consumed under ideal circumstances.

Journal

Dairy Science & TechnologySpringer Journals

Published: May 21, 2011

References