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Increased CLA content in organic milk fermented by bifidobacteria or yoghurt cultures

Increased CLA content in organic milk fermented by bifidobacteria or yoghurt cultures This study investigates the kinetics of acidification, fatty acid (FA) profile and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA, C18:2 c9, t11) content in fermented milks prepared from organic and conventional milk. Fermented milks were manufactured with five mixed cultures: four different strains of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis (BL04, B94, BB12 and HN019) and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus LB340, in co-culture with Streptococcus thermophilus TA040. The composition of milk was evaluated, and the kinetics of acidification was followed by continuous pH measurement using the Cinac system. The profile of FA, including CLA, was analyzed by gas chromatography. The chemical composition of conventional and organic milk was similar, with the exception of protein and Fe, the concentrations of which were higher in the organic milk. The rate of acidification was significantly influenced by the type of milk and the bacterial strain used. Co-cultures St-HN019 and St-BB12 showed higher maximal acidification rates in both milks. Final counts of S. thermophilus (9.0–10.1 log10 colony forming units (CFU)·mL−1), Lactobacillus bulgaricus (8.2–8.5 log10 CFU·mL−1) and B. animalis subsp. lactis strains (8.3−9.3 log10 CFU·mL−1) did not differ significantly in either milk. Unexpectedly, all fermented organic milks contained significantly higher amounts of CLA than the same milk before fermentation, whereas CLA amounts did not change during fermentation of conventional milk. Regardless of the type of milk, CLA was found to be significantly positively correlated with trans-vaccenic acid and negatively correlated with linoleic acid. Moreover, the CLA contents were significantly higher in fermented milks showing shorter fermentation times. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Dairy Science & Technology Springer Journals

Increased CLA content in organic milk fermented by bifidobacteria or yoghurt cultures

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 by Springer S+B Media B.V.
Subject
Chemistry; Food Science; Agriculture; Microbiology
ISSN
1958-5586
eISSN
1958-5594
DOI
10.1051/dst/2009030
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study investigates the kinetics of acidification, fatty acid (FA) profile and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA, C18:2 c9, t11) content in fermented milks prepared from organic and conventional milk. Fermented milks were manufactured with five mixed cultures: four different strains of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis (BL04, B94, BB12 and HN019) and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus LB340, in co-culture with Streptococcus thermophilus TA040. The composition of milk was evaluated, and the kinetics of acidification was followed by continuous pH measurement using the Cinac system. The profile of FA, including CLA, was analyzed by gas chromatography. The chemical composition of conventional and organic milk was similar, with the exception of protein and Fe, the concentrations of which were higher in the organic milk. The rate of acidification was significantly influenced by the type of milk and the bacterial strain used. Co-cultures St-HN019 and St-BB12 showed higher maximal acidification rates in both milks. Final counts of S. thermophilus (9.0–10.1 log10 colony forming units (CFU)·mL−1), Lactobacillus bulgaricus (8.2–8.5 log10 CFU·mL−1) and B. animalis subsp. lactis strains (8.3−9.3 log10 CFU·mL−1) did not differ significantly in either milk. Unexpectedly, all fermented organic milks contained significantly higher amounts of CLA than the same milk before fermentation, whereas CLA amounts did not change during fermentation of conventional milk. Regardless of the type of milk, CLA was found to be significantly positively correlated with trans-vaccenic acid and negatively correlated with linoleic acid. Moreover, the CLA contents were significantly higher in fermented milks showing shorter fermentation times.

Journal

Dairy Science & TechnologySpringer Journals

Published: May 21, 2011

References