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In these pages ...

In these pages ... The American Journal of Vol. 55, No. 4, 1995 This Journal, founded by the psychoanalyst Karen Homey, has long sought to address the causes of feminism. In the current Journal issue, we further our feminist project in attending to the different voices of feminism, cogently charted by Muriel Dimen. She finds a First Step in Freud's suc- cessful initiative by providing a discourse that enabled female development and gender organization to be placed on the table in the first place. Freud's conclusions, unacceptable to Karen Homey and Clara Thompson, led to a palpable feminist critique arising from what they regarded to be a far-rang- ing cultural misogyny--what Dimen calls the Second Step. This critique has tended to evolve along two lines: so-called "difference" feminism--the perspective that insists women be granted status equivalent to that of men and appreciated for their innate differences--and "gender" feminism--the perspective that sharply critiques how gender itself is conceived. This leads to Dimen's Third Step: How do we interrogate the tension between the ameliorative impulse of difference feminism, on the one hand, and the critical impulse to destablize normalizing stereotypy, on the other. Spe- cified through the discourse of postmodernism, Dimen reaches toward a vision http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The American Journal of Psychoanalysis Springer Journals

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
1995 Association for the Advancement of Psychoanalysis
ISSN
0002-9548
eISSN
1573-6741
DOI
10.1007/BF02741979
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The American Journal of Vol. 55, No. 4, 1995 This Journal, founded by the psychoanalyst Karen Homey, has long sought to address the causes of feminism. In the current Journal issue, we further our feminist project in attending to the different voices of feminism, cogently charted by Muriel Dimen. She finds a First Step in Freud's suc- cessful initiative by providing a discourse that enabled female development and gender organization to be placed on the table in the first place. Freud's conclusions, unacceptable to Karen Homey and Clara Thompson, led to a palpable feminist critique arising from what they regarded to be a far-rang- ing cultural misogyny--what Dimen calls the Second Step. This critique has tended to evolve along two lines: so-called "difference" feminism--the perspective that insists women be granted status equivalent to that of men and appreciated for their innate differences--and "gender" feminism--the perspective that sharply critiques how gender itself is conceived. This leads to Dimen's Third Step: How do we interrogate the tension between the ameliorative impulse of difference feminism, on the one hand, and the critical impulse to destablize normalizing stereotypy, on the other. Spe- cified through the discourse of postmodernism, Dimen reaches toward a vision

Journal

The American Journal of PsychoanalysisSpringer Journals

Published: Dec 1, 1995

Keywords: Clinical Psychology; Psychotherapy; Psychoanalysis

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