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Implementation During a Pandemic: Findings, Successes, and Lessons Learned from Community Grantees

Implementation During a Pandemic: Findings, Successes, and Lessons Learned from Community Grantees Funding communities through mini-grant programs builds community capacity by fostering leadership among community members, developing expertise in implementing evidence-based practices, and increasing trust in partnerships. The South Carolina Cancer Prevention and Control Research Network (SC-CPCRN) implemented the Community Health Intervention Program (CHIP) mini-grants initiative to address cancer-related health disparities among high-risk populations in rural areas of the state. One community-based organization and one faith-based organization were funded during the most recent call for proposals. The organizations implemented National Cancer Institute evidence-based strategies and programs focused on health and cancer screenings and physical activity and promotion of walking trails. Despite the potential for the COVID-19 pandemic to serve as a major barrier to implementation, grantees successfully recruited and engaged community members in evidence-based activities. These initiatives added material benefits to their local communities, including promotion of walking outdoors where it is less likely to contract the virus when socially distanced and provision of COVID-19 testing and vaccines along with other health and cancer screenings. Future mini-grants programs will benefit from learning from current grantees’ flexibility in program implementation during a pandemic as well as their intentional approach to modifying program aspects as needed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Cancer Education Springer Journals

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s) under exclusive licence to American Association for Cancer Education 2022. Springer Nature or its licensor holds exclusive rights to this article under a publishing agreement with the author(s) or other rightsholder(s); author self-archiving of the accepted manuscript version of this article is solely governed by the terms of such publishing agreement and applicable law.
ISSN
0885-8195
eISSN
1543-0154
DOI
10.1007/s13187-022-02213-4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Funding communities through mini-grant programs builds community capacity by fostering leadership among community members, developing expertise in implementing evidence-based practices, and increasing trust in partnerships. The South Carolina Cancer Prevention and Control Research Network (SC-CPCRN) implemented the Community Health Intervention Program (CHIP) mini-grants initiative to address cancer-related health disparities among high-risk populations in rural areas of the state. One community-based organization and one faith-based organization were funded during the most recent call for proposals. The organizations implemented National Cancer Institute evidence-based strategies and programs focused on health and cancer screenings and physical activity and promotion of walking trails. Despite the potential for the COVID-19 pandemic to serve as a major barrier to implementation, grantees successfully recruited and engaged community members in evidence-based activities. These initiatives added material benefits to their local communities, including promotion of walking outdoors where it is less likely to contract the virus when socially distanced and provision of COVID-19 testing and vaccines along with other health and cancer screenings. Future mini-grants programs will benefit from learning from current grantees’ flexibility in program implementation during a pandemic as well as their intentional approach to modifying program aspects as needed.

Journal

Journal of Cancer EducationSpringer Journals

Published: Sep 3, 2022

Keywords: Community-Engaged Research; Mini-Grants; Implementation; COVID-19

References