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Impacts of under-canopy vegetation on stand growth in two pine saw-timber stands, South Africa

Impacts of under-canopy vegetation on stand growth in two pine saw-timber stands, South Africa Background: In pine plantations, shading following canopy closure reduces the growth of competing vegetation. However, canopy closure is not always achieved if low initial planting density, pruning and thinning are practised. This means that complete shading does not occur, resulting in stands with potentially competitive levels of under- canopy vegetation. Methods: At the time of the first pruning operation, two trials were established to determine the competitive effect of under-canopy vegetation on pine tree growth in South Africa, one on a Pinus patula Schiede ex Schltdl. & Cham. (4.5 years) and one on a Pinus tecunumanii F.Schwerdtf. ex Eguiluz & J.P.Perry (2.9 years) stand. This paper documents results at the final thinning operation carried out at 17–18 years. Treatments were weedy (no vegetation control), herbaceous (complete sustained control of woody vegetation), woody (complete sustained control of herbaceous vegetation), weedfree (complete sustained control of all competing vegetation) and operational (only the woody perennial broadleaves were removed prior to any pruning/thinning event in the commercial weed control treatment). From the time vegetation management treatments were first imposed, they were maintained and tree performance monitored over 14–15 successive growing seasons, including and up to the second and final −1 thinning to 250 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png New Zealand Journal of Forestry Science Springer Journals

Impacts of under-canopy vegetation on stand growth in two pine saw-timber stands, South Africa

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by The Author(s).
Subject
Life Sciences; Forestry
eISSN
1179-5395
DOI
10.1186/s40490-017-0107-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Background: In pine plantations, shading following canopy closure reduces the growth of competing vegetation. However, canopy closure is not always achieved if low initial planting density, pruning and thinning are practised. This means that complete shading does not occur, resulting in stands with potentially competitive levels of under- canopy vegetation. Methods: At the time of the first pruning operation, two trials were established to determine the competitive effect of under-canopy vegetation on pine tree growth in South Africa, one on a Pinus patula Schiede ex Schltdl. & Cham. (4.5 years) and one on a Pinus tecunumanii F.Schwerdtf. ex Eguiluz & J.P.Perry (2.9 years) stand. This paper documents results at the final thinning operation carried out at 17–18 years. Treatments were weedy (no vegetation control), herbaceous (complete sustained control of woody vegetation), woody (complete sustained control of herbaceous vegetation), weedfree (complete sustained control of all competing vegetation) and operational (only the woody perennial broadleaves were removed prior to any pruning/thinning event in the commercial weed control treatment). From the time vegetation management treatments were first imposed, they were maintained and tree performance monitored over 14–15 successive growing seasons, including and up to the second and final −1 thinning to 250

Journal

New Zealand Journal of Forestry ScienceSpringer Journals

Published: Jan 30, 2018

References