Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Impact of a Cancer Health Education Curriculum Among Milwaukee Public High School Students

Impact of a Cancer Health Education Curriculum Among Milwaukee Public High School Students In Milwaukee and nationwide, cancer incidence, late-stage diagnosis, and mortality are notably higher among some racial/ethnic populations. Cancer education has the potential to impact cancer burden and reduce cancer disparities. In particular, the addition of a service-learning component to academic curriculums has been shown to improve student learning as well as positively impact the surrounding community. This study implemented a cancer health education curriculum (CHEC) at a Milwaukee public high school with the goal of addressing cancer knowledge, fear and fatalism beliefs, and risk behaviors. The curriculum included interactive learning sessions and a service-learning final project. Five-hundred twenty-one students also completed pre- and post-surveys assessing cancer knowledge, fear and fatalism, risk behaviors, cancer-related communication, and a qualitative question asking what they hoped to gain (pre) or did gain (post) from the course. Results indicate (1) a significant improvement in cancer knowledge (p < 0.0001), (2) a decrease in cancer fear and fatalism (p < 0.0001), (3) an increase in fruit consumption (p < 0.0001), (4) a decrease in screen time (p = 0.0004), and (5) an increase in how often students spoke with their family about cancer (p < 0.0001). Qualitative data reflect important gains such as increased interest in sharing their knowledge about cancer with their community. Providing cancer education and leveraging a service-learning requirement led to notable changes in high school students’ cancer knowledge, fear and fatalism, and risk behaviors. Students also communicated more with family/friends about cancer. Such efforts could have broader implications for student, family, and community cancer burden. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Cancer Education Springer Journals

Impact of a Cancer Health Education Curriculum Among Milwaukee Public High School Students

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/impact-of-a-cancer-health-education-curriculum-among-milwaukee-public-qMxD7c0DCH
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s) under exclusive licence to American Association for Cancer Education 2022. Springer Nature or its licensor holds exclusive rights to this article under a publishing agreement with the author(s) or other rightsholder(s); author self-archiving of the accepted manuscript version of this article is solely governed by the terms of such publishing agreement and applicable law.
ISSN
0885-8195
eISSN
1543-0154
DOI
10.1007/s13187-022-02228-x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In Milwaukee and nationwide, cancer incidence, late-stage diagnosis, and mortality are notably higher among some racial/ethnic populations. Cancer education has the potential to impact cancer burden and reduce cancer disparities. In particular, the addition of a service-learning component to academic curriculums has been shown to improve student learning as well as positively impact the surrounding community. This study implemented a cancer health education curriculum (CHEC) at a Milwaukee public high school with the goal of addressing cancer knowledge, fear and fatalism beliefs, and risk behaviors. The curriculum included interactive learning sessions and a service-learning final project. Five-hundred twenty-one students also completed pre- and post-surveys assessing cancer knowledge, fear and fatalism, risk behaviors, cancer-related communication, and a qualitative question asking what they hoped to gain (pre) or did gain (post) from the course. Results indicate (1) a significant improvement in cancer knowledge (p < 0.0001), (2) a decrease in cancer fear and fatalism (p < 0.0001), (3) an increase in fruit consumption (p < 0.0001), (4) a decrease in screen time (p = 0.0004), and (5) an increase in how often students spoke with their family about cancer (p < 0.0001). Qualitative data reflect important gains such as increased interest in sharing their knowledge about cancer with their community. Providing cancer education and leveraging a service-learning requirement led to notable changes in high school students’ cancer knowledge, fear and fatalism, and risk behaviors. Students also communicated more with family/friends about cancer. Such efforts could have broader implications for student, family, and community cancer burden.

Journal

Journal of Cancer EducationSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 17, 2022

Keywords: High school; Cancer education; Disparities; Service learning

References