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Immunohistochemistry reveals an increased number of ganglion cells in the normal-size plexus, as a pathological feature of immaturity of ganglia

Immunohistochemistry reveals an increased number of ganglion cells in the normal-size plexus, as... Immaturity of ganglia (IG), is a rare entity of an allied disorder of Hirschsprung’s disease. We reviewed our IG cases to provide further pathological insight into IG. The clinical data and pathological findings of IG cases in our department from 2011 to 2020 were examined. Hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining and immunostaining for HuC/D, BCL-2, SOX10, and CD56 were performed on full-thickness specimens. Sufficient clinical data and pathological specimens were available in five cases during the study period. The patient profiles were as follows: four term infants and one preterm infant with initial symptoms of abdominal distension or vomiting; all cases underwent ileostomy at a median age of 2 days and stoma closure at a median age of 5 months. Although the interpretation of HE staining was difficult, immunostaining for HuC/D and SOX10 clearly distinguished ganglion cells from glial cells. The number of ganglion cells in the IG group was significantly greater than that in the control group (p < 0.05), while the number of enteric glial cells and total area of the myenteric nerve plexus did not differ. The finding of the increased number of ganglion cells in a normal-size myenteric plexus is a novel feature of IG that contributes to its accurate diagnosis. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Comparative Clinical Pathology Springer Journals

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer-Verlag London Ltd., part of Springer Nature 2022. Springer Nature or its licensor holds exclusive rights to this article under a publishing agreement with the author(s) or other rightsholder(s); author self-archiving of the accepted manuscript version of this article is solely governed by the terms of such publishing agreement and applicable law.
eISSN
1618-565X
DOI
10.1007/s00580-022-03390-w
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Immaturity of ganglia (IG), is a rare entity of an allied disorder of Hirschsprung’s disease. We reviewed our IG cases to provide further pathological insight into IG. The clinical data and pathological findings of IG cases in our department from 2011 to 2020 were examined. Hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining and immunostaining for HuC/D, BCL-2, SOX10, and CD56 were performed on full-thickness specimens. Sufficient clinical data and pathological specimens were available in five cases during the study period. The patient profiles were as follows: four term infants and one preterm infant with initial symptoms of abdominal distension or vomiting; all cases underwent ileostomy at a median age of 2 days and stoma closure at a median age of 5 months. Although the interpretation of HE staining was difficult, immunostaining for HuC/D and SOX10 clearly distinguished ganglion cells from glial cells. The number of ganglion cells in the IG group was significantly greater than that in the control group (p < 0.05), while the number of enteric glial cells and total area of the myenteric nerve plexus did not differ. The finding of the increased number of ganglion cells in a normal-size myenteric plexus is a novel feature of IG that contributes to its accurate diagnosis.

Journal

Comparative Clinical PathologySpringer Journals

Published: Dec 1, 2022

Keywords: Allied disorders of Hirschsprung’s disease; Hirschsprung’s disease; Immaturity of Ganglia; Immunostaining; Myenteric plexus

References