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Hydrophobic Organic Matter Promotes Coxsackievirus B5 Stabilization and Protection from Heat

Hydrophobic Organic Matter Promotes Coxsackievirus B5 Stabilization and Protection from Heat In urban rivers, many of which are used for drinking water production, viruses encounter a range of particulate, colloidal, and dissolved organic and inorganic compounds. To date, the impact of environmental organic matter on virus persistence in the environment has received little attention. In the present study, fresh water was fractioned to separate particulate natural organic matter from dissolved forms. Each fraction was tested for its ability to promote coxsackievirus B5 resistance to heat inactivation. Our results demonstrate that, at natural concentrations, environmental waters contain particulate or dissolved compounds that are able to protect viruses from heat. We also show that hydrophobic compounds promote an efficient protection against heat inactivation. This study suggests that local conditions encountered by viruses in the environment could greatly impact their persistence. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Food and Environmental Virology Springer Journals

Hydrophobic Organic Matter Promotes Coxsackievirus B5 Stabilization and Protection from Heat

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2020
Subject
Biomedicine; Virology; Food Science; Chemistry/Food Science, general
ISSN
1867-0334
eISSN
1867-0342
DOI
10.1007/s12560-019-09418-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In urban rivers, many of which are used for drinking water production, viruses encounter a range of particulate, colloidal, and dissolved organic and inorganic compounds. To date, the impact of environmental organic matter on virus persistence in the environment has received little attention. In the present study, fresh water was fractioned to separate particulate natural organic matter from dissolved forms. Each fraction was tested for its ability to promote coxsackievirus B5 resistance to heat inactivation. Our results demonstrate that, at natural concentrations, environmental waters contain particulate or dissolved compounds that are able to protect viruses from heat. We also show that hydrophobic compounds promote an efficient protection against heat inactivation. This study suggests that local conditions encountered by viruses in the environment could greatly impact their persistence.

Journal

Food and Environmental VirologySpringer Journals

Published: Jun 7, 2020

References