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HPV-Associated Anal Cancer Knowledge, Attitudes, and Health Communication Behaviors Among Non-clinical Providers at HIV/AIDS Service Organizations in Southern United States Region

HPV-Associated Anal Cancer Knowledge, Attitudes, and Health Communication Behaviors Among... Co-infection with HIV/HPV and bio-behavioral risk factors (e.g., immunodeficiency, un-protected sex) increase likelihood for developing anal and other HPV-associated cancers among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). We explored knowledge, attitudes, and health communication regarding HPV-associated anal cancers among HIV/AIDS service organization (ASO) employees/volunteers delivering non-clinical services to PLWHA. Participants (n=59) were recruited from six ASOs located in the South United States Census region and completed a 118-item self-administered survey. For current analyses, outcome measures were knowledge, attitudes, and health communication regarding anal cancer. Descriptive statistics assessed outcome measures which were subsequently dichotomized into binary variables (i.e., high/favorable or low/unfavorable). Fisher’s exact test examined associations between outcome measures and ASO employees/volunteers’ sex/sexual orientation (i.e., heterosexual female, heterosexual male, LGBTI female, LGBTI male). Mean age for ASO employees/volunteers was 45.5 years (±13.5 SD). Participants were heterosexual females (45.7%), LGBTI males (27.3%), heterosexual males (13.5%), and LGBTI females (13.5%). Almost half (44.8%) had not heard about anal Pap screening and 39.0% did not think HPV can cause anal cancer. Overall, 73.9% had low knowledge scores. Participants (47.4%) were unsure or believed HPV vaccinations were non-protective against anal cancer while 94.9% had favorable health communication behaviors. Knowledge regarding anal cancer being linked to HPV (p=0.006) and health information seeking on anal cancer (p=0.000) were statistically significantly different by sex/sexual orientation. Fostering increased knowledge, favorable attitudes, and improved health communication behaviors among ASO employees/volunteers could facilitate dissemination and promotion of anal cancer prevention strategies (anal Pap screenings, HPV vaccinations) among PLWHA. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Cancer Education Springer Journals

HPV-Associated Anal Cancer Knowledge, Attitudes, and Health Communication Behaviors Among Non-clinical Providers at HIV/AIDS Service Organizations in Southern United States Region

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © American Association for Cancer Education 2021
ISSN
0885-8195
eISSN
1543-0154
DOI
10.1007/s13187-021-02056-5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Co-infection with HIV/HPV and bio-behavioral risk factors (e.g., immunodeficiency, un-protected sex) increase likelihood for developing anal and other HPV-associated cancers among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). We explored knowledge, attitudes, and health communication regarding HPV-associated anal cancers among HIV/AIDS service organization (ASO) employees/volunteers delivering non-clinical services to PLWHA. Participants (n=59) were recruited from six ASOs located in the South United States Census region and completed a 118-item self-administered survey. For current analyses, outcome measures were knowledge, attitudes, and health communication regarding anal cancer. Descriptive statistics assessed outcome measures which were subsequently dichotomized into binary variables (i.e., high/favorable or low/unfavorable). Fisher’s exact test examined associations between outcome measures and ASO employees/volunteers’ sex/sexual orientation (i.e., heterosexual female, heterosexual male, LGBTI female, LGBTI male). Mean age for ASO employees/volunteers was 45.5 years (±13.5 SD). Participants were heterosexual females (45.7%), LGBTI males (27.3%), heterosexual males (13.5%), and LGBTI females (13.5%). Almost half (44.8%) had not heard about anal Pap screening and 39.0% did not think HPV can cause anal cancer. Overall, 73.9% had low knowledge scores. Participants (47.4%) were unsure or believed HPV vaccinations were non-protective against anal cancer while 94.9% had favorable health communication behaviors. Knowledge regarding anal cancer being linked to HPV (p=0.006) and health information seeking on anal cancer (p=0.000) were statistically significantly different by sex/sexual orientation. Fostering increased knowledge, favorable attitudes, and improved health communication behaviors among ASO employees/volunteers could facilitate dissemination and promotion of anal cancer prevention strategies (anal Pap screenings, HPV vaccinations) among PLWHA.

Journal

Journal of Cancer EducationSpringer Journals

Published: Dec 1, 2022

Keywords: Human papillomavirus (HPV); Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV); Anal cancer; Anal cancer screenings; Vaccinations; Knowledge; Health communication

References