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How to tailor heat-induced whey protein/κ-casein complexes as a means to investigate the acid gelation of milk—a review

How to tailor heat-induced whey protein/κ-casein complexes as a means to investigate the acid... The heat treatment of milk greatly improves the acid gelation of milk and is therefore largely applied in yoghurt manufacture. During the heat treatment, soluble and micelle-bound whey protein/κ-casein complexes are produced in milk. The complexes and their physico-chemical properties have been held responsible for the early gelation point, the increased final firmness and for the serum retention capacity of the acid gels made of heated milk. They are suspected to bring new functionalities to the casein micelles and to help the formation of interactions when building the gel network. In order to investigate the type of interactions that the complexes can affect throughout the acid gelation of milk, an original strategy would be to control the physico-chemical properties of the whey protein/κ-casein soluble complexes and to use them as vectors to modify the possible interactions in the milk. In that perspective, the different physico-chemical properties of the whey protein/κ-casein soluble complexes that are thought to significantly affect the acid gelation behaviour of the casein micelles are listed. Then, the physical, chemical and biological means that could possibly be applied to the formation of complexes in order to modulate each of the targeted property are reviewed and evaluated. In order to open a large choice for future investigation, these methods were found in a larger literature resource than milk, including other protein systems like model whey protein solutions or non-dairy globular protein systems. The food-compatible character of some of these means is indicated, for their potential technological interest. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Dairy Science & Technology Springer Journals

How to tailor heat-induced whey protein/κ-casein complexes as a means to investigate the acid gelation of milk—a review

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 by INRA and Springer Science+Business Media B.V.
Subject
Chemistry; Agriculture; Food Science ; Microbiology
ISSN
1958-5586
eISSN
1958-5594
DOI
10.1007/s13594-011-0013-x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The heat treatment of milk greatly improves the acid gelation of milk and is therefore largely applied in yoghurt manufacture. During the heat treatment, soluble and micelle-bound whey protein/κ-casein complexes are produced in milk. The complexes and their physico-chemical properties have been held responsible for the early gelation point, the increased final firmness and for the serum retention capacity of the acid gels made of heated milk. They are suspected to bring new functionalities to the casein micelles and to help the formation of interactions when building the gel network. In order to investigate the type of interactions that the complexes can affect throughout the acid gelation of milk, an original strategy would be to control the physico-chemical properties of the whey protein/κ-casein soluble complexes and to use them as vectors to modify the possible interactions in the milk. In that perspective, the different physico-chemical properties of the whey protein/κ-casein soluble complexes that are thought to significantly affect the acid gelation behaviour of the casein micelles are listed. Then, the physical, chemical and biological means that could possibly be applied to the formation of complexes in order to modulate each of the targeted property are reviewed and evaluated. In order to open a large choice for future investigation, these methods were found in a larger literature resource than milk, including other protein systems like model whey protein solutions or non-dairy globular protein systems. The food-compatible character of some of these means is indicated, for their potential technological interest.

Journal

Dairy Science & TechnologySpringer Journals

Published: Mar 18, 2011

References