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Hormone Therapy Adjuvant to Radiotherapy in Non-Metastatic Prostate Cancer Settings

Hormone Therapy Adjuvant to Radiotherapy in Non-Metastatic Prostate Cancer Settings Background:Hormone therapy is commonly used with radiotherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer. Aim:To provide a single-institution analysis of the benefits of hormone therapy with radiotherapy in different non-metastatic prostate cancer scenarios. Methods:The records of 527 patients receiving radiotherapy for locally advanced, localized, and post-prostatectomy disease were reviewed. For the 422 patients with localized disease, biochemical failure-free survival curves were generated for patients receiving or not receiving hormone therapy (with biochemical failure defined as three successive rises after prostate-specific antigen nadir). The survival curves were compared using the log-rank test and a multivariate analysis of all major patient, disease, and treatment factors was performed. Additionally, failure rates were compared using the chi-square test to determine the benefit of hormone therapy across each of the locally advanced, localized, and post-prostatectomy settings. Results:An advantage for the use of hormone therapy compared with radiotherapy alone was observed in the population with localized disease (3-year biochemical failure-free survival 78% vs 75%; p = 0.029). Of the patient, disease, and treatment factors analyzed, only clinical T-stage (p = 0.002), radiation dose (p = 0.006), and hormone therapy (p = 0.016) reached statistical significance on multivariate analysis. Furthermore, lower failure rates occured (with at least a trend observed [p < 0.10]) in patients receiving hormone therapy in each clinical scenario, with the exception of the localized low-risk subgroup. Conclusion:In a single-institution analysis, the addition of hormone therapy to radiotherapy was advantageous in all settings of non-metastatic prostate cancer except that of the very earliest disease presentation. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Cancer Springer Journals

Hormone Therapy Adjuvant to Radiotherapy in Non-Metastatic Prostate Cancer Settings

American Journal of Cancer , Volume 5 (3) – Aug 10, 2012

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 by Adis Data Information BV
Subject
Pharmacy; Pharmacy
ISSN
1175-6357
DOI
10.2165/00024669-200605030-00006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Background:Hormone therapy is commonly used with radiotherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer. Aim:To provide a single-institution analysis of the benefits of hormone therapy with radiotherapy in different non-metastatic prostate cancer scenarios. Methods:The records of 527 patients receiving radiotherapy for locally advanced, localized, and post-prostatectomy disease were reviewed. For the 422 patients with localized disease, biochemical failure-free survival curves were generated for patients receiving or not receiving hormone therapy (with biochemical failure defined as three successive rises after prostate-specific antigen nadir). The survival curves were compared using the log-rank test and a multivariate analysis of all major patient, disease, and treatment factors was performed. Additionally, failure rates were compared using the chi-square test to determine the benefit of hormone therapy across each of the locally advanced, localized, and post-prostatectomy settings. Results:An advantage for the use of hormone therapy compared with radiotherapy alone was observed in the population with localized disease (3-year biochemical failure-free survival 78% vs 75%; p = 0.029). Of the patient, disease, and treatment factors analyzed, only clinical T-stage (p = 0.002), radiation dose (p = 0.006), and hormone therapy (p = 0.016) reached statistical significance on multivariate analysis. Furthermore, lower failure rates occured (with at least a trend observed [p < 0.10]) in patients receiving hormone therapy in each clinical scenario, with the exception of the localized low-risk subgroup. Conclusion:In a single-institution analysis, the addition of hormone therapy to radiotherapy was advantageous in all settings of non-metastatic prostate cancer except that of the very earliest disease presentation.

Journal

American Journal of CancerSpringer Journals

Published: Aug 10, 2012

References