Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Subscribe now for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Horizontal Inequalities and ConflictInequalities, the Political Environment and Civil Conflict: Evidence from 55 Developing Countries

Horizontal Inequalities and Conflict: Inequalities, the Political Environment and Civil Conflict:... [This chapter addresses the interplay between socioeconomic and identity-related factors in civil conflict, guided by the concept of horizontal inequalities (HIs). In a series of case studies, Stewart (2002) found that various dimensions of HIs provoked some kind of conflict, ranging from a high level of criminality in Brazil to civil war in Uganda and Sri Lanka. In order to test whether these findings can be generalized beyond the particular case studies, there is a need for large-N investigations. Drawing on national survey data, Østby (2008) provided quantitative evidence that Stewart’s findings hold when socioeconomic inequalities between ethnic groups are tested systematically across 36 developing countries. Moreover, I found similar effects for horizontal inequalities at the regional level with a larger sample (Østby, 2005).] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Horizontal Inequalities and ConflictInequalities, the Political Environment and Civil Conflict: Evidence from 55 Developing Countries

Part of the Conflict, Inequality and Ethnicity Book Series
Editors: Stewart, Frances

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/horizontal-inequalities-and-conflict-inequalities-the-political-sbMA03sDLH

References (0)

References for this paper are not available at this time. We will be adding them shortly, thank you for your patience.

Publisher
Palgrave Macmillan UK
Copyright
© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 2008
ISBN
978-1-349-35462-7
Pages
136 –159
DOI
10.1057/9780230582729_7
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[This chapter addresses the interplay between socioeconomic and identity-related factors in civil conflict, guided by the concept of horizontal inequalities (HIs). In a series of case studies, Stewart (2002) found that various dimensions of HIs provoked some kind of conflict, ranging from a high level of criminality in Brazil to civil war in Uganda and Sri Lanka. In order to test whether these findings can be generalized beyond the particular case studies, there is a need for large-N investigations. Drawing on national survey data, Østby (2008) provided quantitative evidence that Stewart’s findings hold when socioeconomic inequalities between ethnic groups are tested systematically across 36 developing countries. Moreover, I found similar effects for horizontal inequalities at the regional level with a larger sample (Østby, 2005).]

Published: Dec 4, 2015

Keywords: Electoral System; Regime Type; Civil Conflict; Group Inequality; Political Exclusion

There are no references for this article.