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Homocysteine-associated Acute Mesenteric Artery Occlusion Treated with Thrombectomy and Bowel Resection

Homocysteine-associated Acute Mesenteric Artery Occlusion Treated with Thrombectomy and Bowel... Elevated plasma homocysteine is an acknowledged risk factor for arteriosclerotic occlusive disease, but little clinical evidence is available regarding its role in acute arterial thrombosis in the absence of an underlying lesion. A 45-year old man presented with an acute abdomen. A magnetic resonance arteriogram (MRA) showed occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery. At exploration, necrotic ileum was resected and the superior mesenteric artery was thrombectomized, restoring normal mesenteric flow. The plasma homocysteine level was 98.8 mmol/L, more than eight times the normal level. No embolic source was identified and an MRA and contrast arteriogram showed no residual occlusive disease in the superior mesenteric artery. Additional studies documented pernicious anemia, which was treated with cobalamin (vitamin B12) injections. This case provides further evidence of an association between hyperhomocysteinemia and acute arterial thrombosis. Hyperhomocysteinemia can result from easily correctible vitamin B12, B6, or dietary folate deficiencies. Plasma homocysteine levels should be determined in young individuals with acute arterial thrombosis whenever a hypercoagulable state is suspected. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annals of Vascular Surgery Springer Journals

Homocysteine-associated Acute Mesenteric Artery Occlusion Treated with Thrombectomy and Bowel Resection

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 by Annals of Vascular Surgery Inc.
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Abdominal Surgery
ISSN
0890-5096
eISSN
1615-5947
DOI
10.1007/s100160010057
pmid
11265092
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Elevated plasma homocysteine is an acknowledged risk factor for arteriosclerotic occlusive disease, but little clinical evidence is available regarding its role in acute arterial thrombosis in the absence of an underlying lesion. A 45-year old man presented with an acute abdomen. A magnetic resonance arteriogram (MRA) showed occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery. At exploration, necrotic ileum was resected and the superior mesenteric artery was thrombectomized, restoring normal mesenteric flow. The plasma homocysteine level was 98.8 mmol/L, more than eight times the normal level. No embolic source was identified and an MRA and contrast arteriogram showed no residual occlusive disease in the superior mesenteric artery. Additional studies documented pernicious anemia, which was treated with cobalamin (vitamin B12) injections. This case provides further evidence of an association between hyperhomocysteinemia and acute arterial thrombosis. Hyperhomocysteinemia can result from easily correctible vitamin B12, B6, or dietary folate deficiencies. Plasma homocysteine levels should be determined in young individuals with acute arterial thrombosis whenever a hypercoagulable state is suspected.

Journal

Annals of Vascular SurgerySpringer Journals

Published: Feb 6, 2014

References