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Hepatitis A Virus: State of the Art

Hepatitis A Virus: State of the Art Hepatitis A is the most common among all hepatitis worldwide in spite of an efficient vaccine and improved hygiene. Shellfish-borne outbreaks are still of major concern causing hundreds of cases and huge economical losses in the present context of global food trade. Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is a unique picornavirus with many differences in its molecular biology including both its incapacity to induce the inhibition of the cellular protein synthesis and a highly biased and deoptimized codon usage with respect the cell. The final goal of this intriguing strategy seems to be the need for a fine-tuning control of the translation kinetics, particularly at the capsid coding region, and the underlying mechanism is the use of a right combination of common and rare codons to allow a regulated ribosome traffic rate thus ensuring the proper protein folding. Capsid folding is critical to warrant a high environmental stability for a virus transmitted through the fecal–oral route with long extracorporeal periods. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Food and Environmental Virology Springer Journals

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 by Springer Science + Business Media, LLC
Subject
Biomedicine; Chemistry/Food Science, general ; Food Science ; Virology
ISSN
1867-0334
eISSN
1867-0342
DOI
10.1007/s12560-010-9044-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Hepatitis A is the most common among all hepatitis worldwide in spite of an efficient vaccine and improved hygiene. Shellfish-borne outbreaks are still of major concern causing hundreds of cases and huge economical losses in the present context of global food trade. Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is a unique picornavirus with many differences in its molecular biology including both its incapacity to induce the inhibition of the cellular protein synthesis and a highly biased and deoptimized codon usage with respect the cell. The final goal of this intriguing strategy seems to be the need for a fine-tuning control of the translation kinetics, particularly at the capsid coding region, and the underlying mechanism is the use of a right combination of common and rare codons to allow a regulated ribosome traffic rate thus ensuring the proper protein folding. Capsid folding is critical to warrant a high environmental stability for a virus transmitted through the fecal–oral route with long extracorporeal periods.

Journal

Food and Environmental VirologySpringer Journals

Published: Jun 18, 2010

References