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Heat treatment of cream affects the physicochemical properties of sweet buttermilk

Heat treatment of cream affects the physicochemical properties of sweet buttermilk The objective of this work was to investigate the effect of heat treatment of sweet creams on the physicochemical properties of sweet industrial buttermilks. Creams with three different heat treatments: low, medium and high, were churned and the corresponding buttermilks were characterised. Furthermore, buttermilks were renneted and centrifuged to obtain insoluble pellets and supernatants. The physicochemical properties such as the particle size measured by laser light scattering and composition of creams, buttermilks, pellets and supernatants were determined and compared. Buttermilk had a composition close to that of skim milk but it contained more phospholipids (PL): 958 (± 137) mg·kg−1, compared with 120 mg·kg−1 in milk. The heat treatment induced a significant decrease in soluble protein contents in creams, buttermilks and soluble fractions as well as an increase in the buttermilk PL/fat ratio, and an increase in supernatant protein and total solids. Buttermilk and supernatant particle sizes ranged from 0.03 to 200 μm, with a maximum at 130 nm, which may correspond to small milk fat globules, phospholipid vesicles or protein aggregates. Fat and PL in buttermilks were recovered in supernatants. The use of buttermilk enzymatic coagulation combined with centrifugation may constitute a means to fractionate milk PL. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Dairy Science & Technology Springer Journals

Heat treatment of cream affects the physicochemical properties of sweet buttermilk

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 by Springer S+B Media B.V.
Subject
Chemistry; Food Science; Agriculture; Microbiology
ISSN
1958-5586
eISSN
1958-5594
DOI
10.1051/dst:2008006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The objective of this work was to investigate the effect of heat treatment of sweet creams on the physicochemical properties of sweet industrial buttermilks. Creams with three different heat treatments: low, medium and high, were churned and the corresponding buttermilks were characterised. Furthermore, buttermilks were renneted and centrifuged to obtain insoluble pellets and supernatants. The physicochemical properties such as the particle size measured by laser light scattering and composition of creams, buttermilks, pellets and supernatants were determined and compared. Buttermilk had a composition close to that of skim milk but it contained more phospholipids (PL): 958 (± 137) mg·kg−1, compared with 120 mg·kg−1 in milk. The heat treatment induced a significant decrease in soluble protein contents in creams, buttermilks and soluble fractions as well as an increase in the buttermilk PL/fat ratio, and an increase in supernatant protein and total solids. Buttermilk and supernatant particle sizes ranged from 0.03 to 200 μm, with a maximum at 130 nm, which may correspond to small milk fat globules, phospholipid vesicles or protein aggregates. Fat and PL in buttermilks were recovered in supernatants. The use of buttermilk enzymatic coagulation combined with centrifugation may constitute a means to fractionate milk PL.

Journal

Dairy Science & TechnologySpringer Journals

Published: May 21, 2011

References