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Genetic Pathway in the Pathogenesis of Therapy-Related Myeloid Neoplasms: A Literature Review

Genetic Pathway in the Pathogenesis of Therapy-Related Myeloid Neoplasms: A Literature Review Therapy-related myeloid neoplasms are a life-threatening and often fatal complication, associated with poor prognosis outcomes and with high-risk unfavorable cytogenetic abnormalities including complex karyotype. They occur after the treatment of primary malignancies using chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy. Such therapy is not specific to cancer cells, and also damages the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of normal cells, resulting in unbalanced and balanced translocations. There are eight genetic pathways, whose details are summarized in this review, depending on the cytogenetic abnormalities induced. This abnormality is the major contributor to the development of therapy-related myeloid neoplasms. The etiology of these neoplasms depends on the complex interaction between the nature and dose of the cytotoxic agent, the environment, and the presence of subsequent inherited mutations. This review aims to elaborate upon recent knowledge regarding the etiology, pathogenesis, and genetic pathways of therapy-related myeloid neoplasms. A deeper understanding of their etiology would aid physicians in more careful monitoring of patients during or after cytotoxic therapy for hematological malignancy. Ultimately, this knowledge could influence initial treatment strategies, with the aim of reducing both the incidence and serious complications of neoplasms. Therefore, early detection of DNA lesions is vital. The authors recommend that primary malignancy be treated with targeted therapy. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Oncology and Therapy Springer Journals

Genetic Pathway in the Pathogenesis of Therapy-Related Myeloid Neoplasms: A Literature Review

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s) 2020
ISSN
2366-1070
eISSN
2366-1089
DOI
10.1007/s40487-020-00111-7
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Therapy-related myeloid neoplasms are a life-threatening and often fatal complication, associated with poor prognosis outcomes and with high-risk unfavorable cytogenetic abnormalities including complex karyotype. They occur after the treatment of primary malignancies using chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy. Such therapy is not specific to cancer cells, and also damages the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of normal cells, resulting in unbalanced and balanced translocations. There are eight genetic pathways, whose details are summarized in this review, depending on the cytogenetic abnormalities induced. This abnormality is the major contributor to the development of therapy-related myeloid neoplasms. The etiology of these neoplasms depends on the complex interaction between the nature and dose of the cytotoxic agent, the environment, and the presence of subsequent inherited mutations. This review aims to elaborate upon recent knowledge regarding the etiology, pathogenesis, and genetic pathways of therapy-related myeloid neoplasms. A deeper understanding of their etiology would aid physicians in more careful monitoring of patients during or after cytotoxic therapy for hematological malignancy. Ultimately, this knowledge could influence initial treatment strategies, with the aim of reducing both the incidence and serious complications of neoplasms. Therefore, early detection of DNA lesions is vital. The authors recommend that primary malignancy be treated with targeted therapy.

Journal

Oncology and TherapySpringer Journals

Published: Jun 16, 2020

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