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Gathering HopewellHistorical Insight into the Directions and Limitations of Recent Research on Hopewell

Gathering Hopewell: Historical Insight into the Directions and Limitations of Recent Research on... Chapter 2 Historical Insight into the Directions and Limitations of Recent Research on Hopewell Christopher Carr The nature of “Hopewell” has not easily been decades, one professional view of it has become defined through archaeological study and dis- especially popular. In that view, Hopewell is seen cussion. The term, “Hopewell”, has been used as the practices, ideas, and material–symbolic professionally in multiple ways over the last representations, especially religious and social century, and this remains the case today, even ones, that were shared widely among Middle as Americanist archaeology has become more Woodland societies of eastern North America. systematic and sensitive in applying sociocul- These widely distributed cultural forms are con- tural anthropological concepts to archaeological trasted with more variable, local secular and patterns. Modern anthropological archaeologists domestic cultural traditions. The dichotomy is have sought to identify and understand Hopewell rooted historically in Caldwell’s (1964) and in the wide sharing of certain material traits and Struever’s (1964, 1965) definition of Hopewell cultural practices over eastern North America as an interregional, religious or socioreligious (e.g., Caldwell 1964; Seeman 1995; Struever phenomenon apart from local cultural ways, es- 1964), in their local cultural manifestations (e.g., pecially subsistence and settlement practices. Greber http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Gathering HopewellHistorical Insight into the Directions and Limitations of Recent Research on Hopewell

Editors: Carr, Christopher; Case, D. Troy
Gathering Hopewell — Jan 1, 2005

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Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
© Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers, New York 2005
ISBN
978-0-306-48478-0
Pages
51 –70
DOI
10.1007/0-387-27327-1_2
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

Chapter 2 Historical Insight into the Directions and Limitations of Recent Research on Hopewell Christopher Carr The nature of “Hopewell” has not easily been decades, one professional view of it has become defined through archaeological study and dis- especially popular. In that view, Hopewell is seen cussion. The term, “Hopewell”, has been used as the practices, ideas, and material–symbolic professionally in multiple ways over the last representations, especially religious and social century, and this remains the case today, even ones, that were shared widely among Middle as Americanist archaeology has become more Woodland societies of eastern North America. systematic and sensitive in applying sociocul- These widely distributed cultural forms are con- tural anthropological concepts to archaeological trasted with more variable, local secular and patterns. Modern anthropological archaeologists domestic cultural traditions. The dichotomy is have sought to identify and understand Hopewell rooted historically in Caldwell’s (1964) and in the wide sharing of certain material traits and Struever’s (1964, 1965) definition of Hopewell cultural practices over eastern North America as an interregional, religious or socioreligious (e.g., Caldwell 1964; Seeman 1995; Struever phenomenon apart from local cultural ways, es- 1964), in their local cultural manifestations (e.g., pecially subsistence and settlement practices. Greber

Published: Jan 1, 2005

Keywords: Local Culture; Domestic Sphere; Burial Mound; Regional Tradition; Middle Woodland

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