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From the Editors:

From the Editors: Artificial Intelligence and Law 1, 1 - 2, 1992 1 © 1992 Kluwer Academic Publishers, Printed in the Netherlands This issue inaugurates a new journal devoted to artificial intelligence and law, an interdis- ciplinary field that combines one of the oldest human intellectual endeavors with one of the youngest. (The oldest known legal text, the Code of Hammurabi, was created approx- imately 3700 years ago, while the field of artificial intelligence can be dated from Alan Turing's 1950 article 1 which begins: 'I propose to consider the question 'Can machines think?' and goes on to define what is now known as the 'Turing Test'.) The field of artificial intelligence (AI) and law has grown from a few small projects during the 1970's to a flourishing international research community today. As legal scholars have recognized that AI offers a new and more precise methodology for repre- senting jurisprudential theories, so also AI researchers have recognized the importance in human reasoning of normative concepts such as duty, responsibility, fault and authority. These communities are increasingly working together to create computational models of the way a (somewhat) formalized structure of legal rules and precedents embodies the norms of society, and the way http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Artificial Intelligence and Law Springer Journals

From the Editors:

Artificial Intelligence and Law , Volume 1 (1) – May 7, 2004

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright
Subject
Computer Science; Artificial Intelligence; IT Law, Media Law, Intellectual Property; Philosophy of Law; Legal Aspects of Computing; Information Storage and Retrieval
ISSN
0924-8463
eISSN
1572-8382
DOI
10.1007/BF00118476
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Artificial Intelligence and Law 1, 1 - 2, 1992 1 © 1992 Kluwer Academic Publishers, Printed in the Netherlands This issue inaugurates a new journal devoted to artificial intelligence and law, an interdis- ciplinary field that combines one of the oldest human intellectual endeavors with one of the youngest. (The oldest known legal text, the Code of Hammurabi, was created approx- imately 3700 years ago, while the field of artificial intelligence can be dated from Alan Turing's 1950 article 1 which begins: 'I propose to consider the question 'Can machines think?' and goes on to define what is now known as the 'Turing Test'.) The field of artificial intelligence (AI) and law has grown from a few small projects during the 1970's to a flourishing international research community today. As legal scholars have recognized that AI offers a new and more precise methodology for repre- senting jurisprudential theories, so also AI researchers have recognized the importance in human reasoning of normative concepts such as duty, responsibility, fault and authority. These communities are increasingly working together to create computational models of the way a (somewhat) formalized structure of legal rules and precedents embodies the norms of society, and the way

Journal

Artificial Intelligence and LawSpringer Journals

Published: May 7, 2004

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