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From fusion to dynamic fusion

From fusion to dynamic fusion ARGOSPINE NEWS & JOURNAL Vol.22 N°2 Editorial - quarterly june 2010 From fusion to dynamic fusion Since the introduction of pedicle screw fixation for the treatment of spinal pathologies in the early 60’s, posterior stabilization systems have gone through several phases. At first, the most common instrumentation for stabilization of the spine was carried out by means of rigid plates: Roy-Camille or Steffee plates made out of stainless steel and dimensioned to resist in vivo forces that were insufficiently understood at the time when compared to the present knowledge of biomechanics. From this time on, spinal instrumentations have undergone many developments, and designs met various fates but eventually migrated toward rods for the most part E. Zylber when the technique of three-dimensional correction of deformities appeared in the 80’s with the CD Director, Global Research system. & Development - Scient’X Yet again, stainless steel remained king for a period of time, as it was then the most readily available material for implants, and together with the desire to correct and stabilize the spine such as to maintain correction and eliminate the need for corset, the instrumentations were designed to ensure a dramatic increase of segmental stiffness, i.e. decrease range http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png ArgoSpine News & Journal Springer Journals

From fusion to dynamic fusion

ArgoSpine News & Journal , Volume 22 (2) – Sep 1, 2010

From fusion to dynamic fusion

Abstract

ARGOSPINE NEWS & JOURNAL Vol.22 N°2 Editorial - quarterly june 2010 From fusion to dynamic fusion Since the introduction of pedicle screw fixation for the treatment of spinal pathologies in the early 60’s, posterior stabilization systems have gone through several phases. At first, the most common instrumentation for stabilization of the spine was carried out by means of rigid plates: Roy-Camille or Steffee plates made out of stainless steel and dimensioned to resist in vivo...
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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 by ARGOS and Springer-Verlag France
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Orthopedics; Surgical Orthopedics; Diagnostic Radiology
ISSN
1957-7729
eISSN
1957-7737
DOI
10.1007/s12240-010-0011-5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ARGOSPINE NEWS & JOURNAL Vol.22 N°2 Editorial - quarterly june 2010 From fusion to dynamic fusion Since the introduction of pedicle screw fixation for the treatment of spinal pathologies in the early 60’s, posterior stabilization systems have gone through several phases. At first, the most common instrumentation for stabilization of the spine was carried out by means of rigid plates: Roy-Camille or Steffee plates made out of stainless steel and dimensioned to resist in vivo forces that were insufficiently understood at the time when compared to the present knowledge of biomechanics. From this time on, spinal instrumentations have undergone many developments, and designs met various fates but eventually migrated toward rods for the most part E. Zylber when the technique of three-dimensional correction of deformities appeared in the 80’s with the CD Director, Global Research system. & Development - Scient’X Yet again, stainless steel remained king for a period of time, as it was then the most readily available material for implants, and together with the desire to correct and stabilize the spine such as to maintain correction and eliminate the need for corset, the instrumentations were designed to ensure a dramatic increase of segmental stiffness, i.e. decrease range

Journal

ArgoSpine News & JournalSpringer Journals

Published: Sep 1, 2010

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