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Fraud Risks in E–commerce Transactions

Fraud Risks in E–commerce Transactions The Geneva Papers on Risk and Insurance Vol. 27 No. 3 (July 2002) 383 – 394 by Wolfgang Wopperer 1. Introduction The following definition of e-commerce was adopted by the European Union. It goes back to the United Nations Centre for Facilitation of Procedures and Practices for Acquisition, Commerce and Transport which adopted it in 1997: Electronic Commerce is defined as doing business electronically. This includes the sharing of structured or unstructured business information by any means (such as electronic mail or messaging, World Wide Web technology, electronic bulletin boards, smart cards, electronic funds transfers, and electronic data interchange) among suppliers, customers, government bodies, and other partners in order to conduct and execute transactions in business, administrative and consumer activities. In Europe, the volume of e-commerce transactions has been constantly on the rise throughout the past years. In 2001, the transaction volume was estimated at A 65 million, which represents a considerable increase over 2000 (A 21 million) and 1999 (A 8 million). Germany accounts for the biggest percentage of this volume (28 per cent), followed by the U.K. (26 per cent), France (10 per cent) and the Netherlands (8 per cent). An analysis of the goods purchased shows http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Geneva Papers on Risk and Insurance - Issues and Practice Springer Journals

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References (13)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 by The International Association for the Study of Insurance Economics
Subject
Finance; Finance, general; Insurance; Risk Management
ISSN
1018-5895
eISSN
1468-0440
DOI
10.1111/1468-0440.00180
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Geneva Papers on Risk and Insurance Vol. 27 No. 3 (July 2002) 383 – 394 by Wolfgang Wopperer 1. Introduction The following definition of e-commerce was adopted by the European Union. It goes back to the United Nations Centre for Facilitation of Procedures and Practices for Acquisition, Commerce and Transport which adopted it in 1997: Electronic Commerce is defined as doing business electronically. This includes the sharing of structured or unstructured business information by any means (such as electronic mail or messaging, World Wide Web technology, electronic bulletin boards, smart cards, electronic funds transfers, and electronic data interchange) among suppliers, customers, government bodies, and other partners in order to conduct and execute transactions in business, administrative and consumer activities. In Europe, the volume of e-commerce transactions has been constantly on the rise throughout the past years. In 2001, the transaction volume was estimated at A 65 million, which represents a considerable increase over 2000 (A 21 million) and 1999 (A 8 million). Germany accounts for the biggest percentage of this volume (28 per cent), followed by the U.K. (26 per cent), France (10 per cent) and the Netherlands (8 per cent). An analysis of the goods purchased shows

Journal

The Geneva Papers on Risk and Insurance - Issues and PracticeSpringer Journals

Published: Jul 1, 2002

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