Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Framing Ethical Concerns and Attitudes towards Human Gene Patents in the Chinese Press

Framing Ethical Concerns and Attitudes towards Human Gene Patents in the Chinese Press This study examines the representations of human gene patents in Chinese newspapers. We conducted a qualitative content analysis of news articles published between 2006 and 2017 to identify the major themes in media coverage, ethical considerations, perceptions of risks and benefits, and attitudes towards the patentability of human genes. The results show that two key ethical concerns were expressed by journalists: (1) that it is morally wrong to own or patent human genes and (2) that gene patents could potentially impede patients’ access to healthcare services. Nonetheless, the press coverage has tended to be largely favorable (57.8%), rather than opposed (17.8%) to human gene patenting. There were no normative claims that human genes should not be patentable in China, which indicates a generally positive attitude towards patentability in media discourse. Most articles that expressed criticism toward gene patenting discussed challenges in other countries, with significant attention given to the United States Supreme Court’s ruling in the Myriad case that invalidated Myriad Genetics’ patents on the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Overall, the newspapers were uncritical of the Chinese gene patenting regime. News reporting on the issue was highly suggestive of a strong pro-commercialization stance, although some discussions emphasized potential risks over benefits. Our analysis highlights the need for balanced media reporting on human gene patents in China and a top-down approach to engage the public in substantive discussions on the ethical and societal implications of the existing patent regime. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Bioethics Review Springer Journals

Framing Ethical Concerns and Attitudes towards Human Gene Patents in the Chinese Press

Asian Bioethics Review , Volume 12 (3) – Sep 1, 2020

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/framing-ethical-concerns-and-attitudes-towards-human-gene-patents-in-7kjXEfqAVx
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © National University of Singapore and Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2020
ISSN
1793-8759
eISSN
1793-9453
DOI
10.1007/s41649-020-00136-0
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study examines the representations of human gene patents in Chinese newspapers. We conducted a qualitative content analysis of news articles published between 2006 and 2017 to identify the major themes in media coverage, ethical considerations, perceptions of risks and benefits, and attitudes towards the patentability of human genes. The results show that two key ethical concerns were expressed by journalists: (1) that it is morally wrong to own or patent human genes and (2) that gene patents could potentially impede patients’ access to healthcare services. Nonetheless, the press coverage has tended to be largely favorable (57.8%), rather than opposed (17.8%) to human gene patenting. There were no normative claims that human genes should not be patentable in China, which indicates a generally positive attitude towards patentability in media discourse. Most articles that expressed criticism toward gene patenting discussed challenges in other countries, with significant attention given to the United States Supreme Court’s ruling in the Myriad case that invalidated Myriad Genetics’ patents on the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Overall, the newspapers were uncritical of the Chinese gene patenting regime. News reporting on the issue was highly suggestive of a strong pro-commercialization stance, although some discussions emphasized potential risks over benefits. Our analysis highlights the need for balanced media reporting on human gene patents in China and a top-down approach to engage the public in substantive discussions on the ethical and societal implications of the existing patent regime.

Journal

Asian Bioethics ReviewSpringer Journals

Published: Sep 1, 2020

There are no references for this article.