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Film Review: Castaway

Film Review: Castaway The American Journal of Psychoanalysis, Vol. 61, No. 3, September 2001 (2001) Film Review Edited by Jeffrey Rubin, M.D. Cast Away and the Creation of the Dialogic Other—the Apostrophe ...Great God! I’d rather be A Pagan suckled in a creed outworn; So might I, standing on this pleasant lee, Have glimpses that would make me less forlorn; ... “Composed Upon Westminster Bridge”—W. Wordsworth In Robert Zameckis’s Cast Away, a volleyball becomes—I’ll explain in a mo- ment—an apostrophe. Since those of us who practice clinical psychoanalytic ther- apy are in a manner of speaking also apostrophes, we may feel a curious identity with ‘Wilson,’ as the volleyball is called by Chuck Noland (Tom Hanks). By apostrophe, I do not refer to the upwardly displaced comma inserted in con- tractions, that word form our English teachers once warned mustn’t be used in for- mal prose. In fact, the more general meaning of apostrophe is as a rhetorical term referring to something that is used to represent something else that is absent or gone. It was Lacan’s contribution, or maybe his trick, to partially reference what these days we call defense mechanisms as Greek rhetorical terms of art. Condensa- tion and displacement http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The American Journal of Psychoanalysis Springer Journals

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 by Association for the Advancement of Psychoanalysis
Subject
Psychology; Clinical Psychology; Psychotherapy; Psychoanalysis
ISSN
0002-9548
eISSN
1573-6741
DOI
10.1023/A:1010285519722
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The American Journal of Psychoanalysis, Vol. 61, No. 3, September 2001 (2001) Film Review Edited by Jeffrey Rubin, M.D. Cast Away and the Creation of the Dialogic Other—the Apostrophe ...Great God! I’d rather be A Pagan suckled in a creed outworn; So might I, standing on this pleasant lee, Have glimpses that would make me less forlorn; ... “Composed Upon Westminster Bridge”—W. Wordsworth In Robert Zameckis’s Cast Away, a volleyball becomes—I’ll explain in a mo- ment—an apostrophe. Since those of us who practice clinical psychoanalytic ther- apy are in a manner of speaking also apostrophes, we may feel a curious identity with ‘Wilson,’ as the volleyball is called by Chuck Noland (Tom Hanks). By apostrophe, I do not refer to the upwardly displaced comma inserted in con- tractions, that word form our English teachers once warned mustn’t be used in for- mal prose. In fact, the more general meaning of apostrophe is as a rhetorical term referring to something that is used to represent something else that is absent or gone. It was Lacan’s contribution, or maybe his trick, to partially reference what these days we call defense mechanisms as Greek rhetorical terms of art. Condensa- tion and displacement

Journal

The American Journal of PsychoanalysisSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 3, 2004

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