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Feedback Delivery in an Academic Cancer Centre: Reflections From an R2C2-based Microlearning Course

Feedback Delivery in an Academic Cancer Centre: Reflections From an R2C2-based Microlearning Course Feedback delivery and training have not been characterized in the context of academic cancer centres. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility and utility of a microlearning course based on the R2C2 (Relationship, Reaction, Content, Coaching) feedback model and characterize multidisciplinary healthcare provider (HCP) perspectives on existing feedback practices in an academic cancer centre. Five HCP (two radiation oncologists, one medical oncologist, and two allied health professionals) with supervisory roles were selected by purposive sampling to participate in a prospective longitudinal qualitative study. Each participant completed a web-based multimedia course. Semi-structured one-on-one interviews were conducted with each participant at four time points: pre- and immediately post-course, and at one- and three-months post course. All participants found the course to be time feasible and completed it in 10–20 min. Participants expressed that the course fulfilled their need for feedback training and that its adoption may normalize a feedback culture in the cancer centre. Three themes were identified regarding perceptions of existing feedback practices: (1) hierarchical and interdisciplinary relationships modulate feedback delivery, (2) interest in feedback delivery varies by duration of the supervisory relationship, and (3) the transactionality of supervisor-trainee relationships influences feedback delivery. This study demonstrates the perceived feasibility and utility of a digital microlearning approach for development of feedback competencies in an academic cancer centre, perceptions of cultural barriers to feedback delivery, and the need for organizational commitment to developing a feedback culture. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Cancer Education Springer Journals

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © American Association for Cancer Education 2021
ISSN
0885-8195
eISSN
1543-0154
DOI
10.1007/s13187-021-02028-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Feedback delivery and training have not been characterized in the context of academic cancer centres. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility and utility of a microlearning course based on the R2C2 (Relationship, Reaction, Content, Coaching) feedback model and characterize multidisciplinary healthcare provider (HCP) perspectives on existing feedback practices in an academic cancer centre. Five HCP (two radiation oncologists, one medical oncologist, and two allied health professionals) with supervisory roles were selected by purposive sampling to participate in a prospective longitudinal qualitative study. Each participant completed a web-based multimedia course. Semi-structured one-on-one interviews were conducted with each participant at four time points: pre- and immediately post-course, and at one- and three-months post course. All participants found the course to be time feasible and completed it in 10–20 min. Participants expressed that the course fulfilled their need for feedback training and that its adoption may normalize a feedback culture in the cancer centre. Three themes were identified regarding perceptions of existing feedback practices: (1) hierarchical and interdisciplinary relationships modulate feedback delivery, (2) interest in feedback delivery varies by duration of the supervisory relationship, and (3) the transactionality of supervisor-trainee relationships influences feedback delivery. This study demonstrates the perceived feasibility and utility of a digital microlearning approach for development of feedback competencies in an academic cancer centre, perceptions of cultural barriers to feedback delivery, and the need for organizational commitment to developing a feedback culture.

Journal

Journal of Cancer EducationSpringer Journals

Published: Dec 1, 2022

Keywords: Feedback; R2C2; Microlearning; Medical education; Residency; Multi-disciplinary

References