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Factors Associated with Cancer Screening Among Hopi Men

Factors Associated with Cancer Screening Among Hopi Men Cancer screening rates remain low among American Indian men, and cancer screening behaviors and barriers to cancer screening among American Indian men are not well understood. This study evaluated cancer screening behaviors in 102 Hopi men who were 50 years of age or older from the Hopi Survey of Cancer and Chronic Disease. Reported cancer screening frequencies were 15.7%, 45.1%, and 35.3% for fecal occult blood test (FOBT), colonoscopy, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test, respectively. Among men who reported having had a FOBT, 81.2% had the test more than 1 year ago. Among men who reported a colonoscopy, 60.8% had colonoscopy within the past 3 years. Similarly, among men who reported having had PSA, 72.3% had PSA within the past 3 years. “No one told me” was the most common answer for not undergoing FOBT (33.7%), colonoscopy (48.2%), and PSA (39.4%). Men who reported having had a PSA or digital rectal exam were three times as likely to also report having a FOBT or colonoscopy (odds ratio [OR] 3.19, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.21–8.46). Younger age (< 65) was associated with reduced odds of ever having prostate cancer screening (OR 0.28, 95% CI: 0.10–0.77). Ever having colorectal cancer screening and previous diagnosis of cancer increased odds of ever having prostate cancer screening (OR 3.15, 95% CI: 1.13–8.81 and OR 5.28, 95% CI: 1.15–24.18 respectively). This study illustrates the importance of community cancer education for men to improve cancer screening participation. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Cancer Education Springer Journals

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © American Association for Cancer Education 2020
ISSN
0885-8195
eISSN
1543-0154
DOI
10.1007/s13187-020-01900-4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Cancer screening rates remain low among American Indian men, and cancer screening behaviors and barriers to cancer screening among American Indian men are not well understood. This study evaluated cancer screening behaviors in 102 Hopi men who were 50 years of age or older from the Hopi Survey of Cancer and Chronic Disease. Reported cancer screening frequencies were 15.7%, 45.1%, and 35.3% for fecal occult blood test (FOBT), colonoscopy, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test, respectively. Among men who reported having had a FOBT, 81.2% had the test more than 1 year ago. Among men who reported a colonoscopy, 60.8% had colonoscopy within the past 3 years. Similarly, among men who reported having had PSA, 72.3% had PSA within the past 3 years. “No one told me” was the most common answer for not undergoing FOBT (33.7%), colonoscopy (48.2%), and PSA (39.4%). Men who reported having had a PSA or digital rectal exam were three times as likely to also report having a FOBT or colonoscopy (odds ratio [OR] 3.19, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.21–8.46). Younger age (< 65) was associated with reduced odds of ever having prostate cancer screening (OR 0.28, 95% CI: 0.10–0.77). Ever having colorectal cancer screening and previous diagnosis of cancer increased odds of ever having prostate cancer screening (OR 3.15, 95% CI: 1.13–8.81 and OR 5.28, 95% CI: 1.15–24.18 respectively). This study illustrates the importance of community cancer education for men to improve cancer screening participation.

Journal

Journal of Cancer EducationSpringer Journals

Published: Aug 1, 2022

Keywords: Hopi; Native Americans; American Indians; Men; Cancer screening

References