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Exploring Racial Differences in Treatment Decision-making in Chinese Immigrant and White American Breast Cancer Patients: the Role of Patient-Provider Communication

Exploring Racial Differences in Treatment Decision-making in Chinese Immigrant and White American... Chinese immigrant cancer patients report suboptimal patient-provider communication, which increases the likelihood of decisional conflict and unsatisfactory treatment decision-making (TDM) outcomes (e.g., low satisfaction and perceived control over cancer care). This cross-sectional study explored whether (1) communication and decisional conflict factors associated with TDM outcomes differed between Chinese immigrant and non-Hispanic White breast cancer patients, and (2) the association between patient-provider communication and the outcomes were mediated by TDM factors, regardless of race. Ninety-eight breast cancer patients, diagnosed at stage I–III participated in cross-sectional survey interviews. TDM outcomes and possible predictors of the outcomes (e.g., patient-provider communication, decisional conflict, preference for who makes the treatment decision) were assessed. Linear regression and mediational testing were performed to examine associations among variables of interest. Of the 98, 85 were included for analysis. Chinese patients with limited English proficiency (n = 37) had poorer patient-provider communication, higher decisional conflict, and preferred providers to make decisions than non-Hispanic White patients (n = 48; all p < .05). They also had lower satisfaction with their TDM process after controlling for predictors (e.g., patient-provider communication) (p < .001). There were no significant racial differences in perceived control, controlling for covariates. Regardless of race, patients who reported quality patient-provider communication reported less decisional conflict. These patients also reported increased satisfaction and perceived control. The disparities Chinese immigrant cancer patients experienced in the TDM process may be related to their cultural communication style with providers. Facilitating Chinese patients’ communication and partnership with providers may reduce decisional conflicts and increase their TDM outcomes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Cancer Education Springer Journals

Exploring Racial Differences in Treatment Decision-making in Chinese Immigrant and White American Breast Cancer Patients: the Role of Patient-Provider Communication

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © American Association for Cancer Education 2021
ISSN
0885-8195
eISSN
1543-0154
DOI
10.1007/s13187-021-02079-y
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Chinese immigrant cancer patients report suboptimal patient-provider communication, which increases the likelihood of decisional conflict and unsatisfactory treatment decision-making (TDM) outcomes (e.g., low satisfaction and perceived control over cancer care). This cross-sectional study explored whether (1) communication and decisional conflict factors associated with TDM outcomes differed between Chinese immigrant and non-Hispanic White breast cancer patients, and (2) the association between patient-provider communication and the outcomes were mediated by TDM factors, regardless of race. Ninety-eight breast cancer patients, diagnosed at stage I–III participated in cross-sectional survey interviews. TDM outcomes and possible predictors of the outcomes (e.g., patient-provider communication, decisional conflict, preference for who makes the treatment decision) were assessed. Linear regression and mediational testing were performed to examine associations among variables of interest. Of the 98, 85 were included for analysis. Chinese patients with limited English proficiency (n = 37) had poorer patient-provider communication, higher decisional conflict, and preferred providers to make decisions than non-Hispanic White patients (n = 48; all p < .05). They also had lower satisfaction with their TDM process after controlling for predictors (e.g., patient-provider communication) (p < .001). There were no significant racial differences in perceived control, controlling for covariates. Regardless of race, patients who reported quality patient-provider communication reported less decisional conflict. These patients also reported increased satisfaction and perceived control. The disparities Chinese immigrant cancer patients experienced in the TDM process may be related to their cultural communication style with providers. Facilitating Chinese patients’ communication and partnership with providers may reduce decisional conflicts and increase their TDM outcomes.

Journal

Journal of Cancer EducationSpringer Journals

Published: Feb 1, 2023

Keywords: Treatment decision-making; Patient-provider communication; Satisfaction; Decisional conflict; Chinese Americans

References