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Exploring Patients’ Understanding of Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy

Exploring Patients’ Understanding of Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy Little quantitative evidence exists surrounding patients’ level of understanding of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) symptoms (numbness, tingling, pain in the hands/feet) and consequences (e.g., negatively affect physical functioning or chemotherapy dosing) at the beginning of chemotherapy. The purpose of this cross-sectional, secondary analysis was to describe CIPN knowledge and education patterns among adults early in a course of neurotoxic chemotherapy for the treatment of cancer (< three infusions). Following consent, participants completed an electronic questionnaire about their perceptions of CIPN symptoms, incidence, and education. Participants (N = 92) were mainly female (76%), white (91%), and diagnosed with breast (46%) or gastrointestinal (40%) cancers. Most participants without CIPN (n = 48) did not expect to develop CIPN (45%) or were unaware of CIPN as a side-effect (30%). Furthermore, 71% of participants without CIPN (n = 31) estimated CIPN to occur in ≤ 30% of patients receiving neurotoxic chemotherapy. Overall, participants learned about CIPN from their doctor or nurse prior to beginning chemotherapy (90%). Clinicians delivered education about CIPN symptoms (75%), but less frequently delivered education about CIPN management (14%), or the impact of CIPN on the ability to continue chemotherapy (16%) or physical functioning (24%). Finally, participants reported that a discussion with their doctor/nurse would be the best way to learn about CIPN (92%). Results revealed that participants without CIPN were largely unaware of the adverse consequences or incidence of CIPN during treatment. Further research is needed to investigate optimal methods to promote patient-clinician communication about CIPN during chemotherapy to enhance patients’ retention of CIPN information and activation in their care. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Cancer Education Springer Journals

Exploring Patients’ Understanding of Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s) under exclusive licence to American Association for Cancer Education 2022. Springer Nature or its licensor holds exclusive rights to this article under a publishing agreement with the author(s) or other rightsholder(s); author self-archiving of the accepted manuscript version of this article is solely governed by the terms of such publishing agreement and applicable law.
ISSN
0885-8195
eISSN
1543-0154
DOI
10.1007/s13187-022-02206-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Little quantitative evidence exists surrounding patients’ level of understanding of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) symptoms (numbness, tingling, pain in the hands/feet) and consequences (e.g., negatively affect physical functioning or chemotherapy dosing) at the beginning of chemotherapy. The purpose of this cross-sectional, secondary analysis was to describe CIPN knowledge and education patterns among adults early in a course of neurotoxic chemotherapy for the treatment of cancer (< three infusions). Following consent, participants completed an electronic questionnaire about their perceptions of CIPN symptoms, incidence, and education. Participants (N = 92) were mainly female (76%), white (91%), and diagnosed with breast (46%) or gastrointestinal (40%) cancers. Most participants without CIPN (n = 48) did not expect to develop CIPN (45%) or were unaware of CIPN as a side-effect (30%). Furthermore, 71% of participants without CIPN (n = 31) estimated CIPN to occur in ≤ 30% of patients receiving neurotoxic chemotherapy. Overall, participants learned about CIPN from their doctor or nurse prior to beginning chemotherapy (90%). Clinicians delivered education about CIPN symptoms (75%), but less frequently delivered education about CIPN management (14%), or the impact of CIPN on the ability to continue chemotherapy (16%) or physical functioning (24%). Finally, participants reported that a discussion with their doctor/nurse would be the best way to learn about CIPN (92%). Results revealed that participants without CIPN were largely unaware of the adverse consequences or incidence of CIPN during treatment. Further research is needed to investigate optimal methods to promote patient-clinician communication about CIPN during chemotherapy to enhance patients’ retention of CIPN information and activation in their care.

Journal

Journal of Cancer EducationSpringer Journals

Published: Aug 5, 2022

Keywords: Neoplasms; Peripheral nervous system diseases; Surveys and questionnaires; Patient education as topic; Communication

References