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Exceptional color preferences for flying adult aquatic insects

Exceptional color preferences for flying adult aquatic insects This study tested the hypothesis that color affects the behavior of Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera (EPT) adults in the riparian zone of a gravel-bed river in northern Japan. EPT abundance was measured using plot scale surveys and a color-choice experiment that utilized non-shiny sticky traps in two contrasting colors, yellow and blue. Chloroperlidae and Hydrobiosidae were caught more abundantly in yellow and blue traps, respectively, whereas other taxa exhibited little or no color-affected responses. We proposed that Chloroperlidae responses were driven by relatively strong diurnal activity compared with those of other taxa. Hydrobiosidae’s preference of blue remained unknown. Understanding the evolutionary background of color preferences in relation to other possibly interfering factors, such as reflection–polarization characteristics, at the species level will help advance the visual sensory ecology of aquatic insects. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aquatic Ecology Springer Journals

Exceptional color preferences for flying adult aquatic insects

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Nature B.V. 2021
ISSN
1386-2588
eISSN
1573-5125
DOI
10.1007/s10452-021-09914-w
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study tested the hypothesis that color affects the behavior of Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera (EPT) adults in the riparian zone of a gravel-bed river in northern Japan. EPT abundance was measured using plot scale surveys and a color-choice experiment that utilized non-shiny sticky traps in two contrasting colors, yellow and blue. Chloroperlidae and Hydrobiosidae were caught more abundantly in yellow and blue traps, respectively, whereas other taxa exhibited little or no color-affected responses. We proposed that Chloroperlidae responses were driven by relatively strong diurnal activity compared with those of other taxa. Hydrobiosidae’s preference of blue remained unknown. Understanding the evolutionary background of color preferences in relation to other possibly interfering factors, such as reflection–polarization characteristics, at the species level will help advance the visual sensory ecology of aquatic insects.

Journal

Aquatic EcologySpringer Journals

Published: Oct 13, 2021

Keywords: Dispersal; EPT; Gravel-bed river; Riparian zone; Sticky traps

References