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Evaluation of milk composition and fresh soft cheese from an intensive silvopastoral system in the tropics

Evaluation of milk composition and fresh soft cheese from an intensive silvopastoral system in... Intensive silvopastoral system (ISS) is a successful sustainable grazing system for dual-purpose cattle with growing adoption in the tropics; however, there is a concern on the quality of dairy products from this system. The aim of this study was to compare the ISS with the traditional monoculture system (MS) in terms of milk composition, soft cheese composition and yield, and the sensory acceptability of cheese during two seasons of a tropical area in Mexico. Twenty-four cows at the first 3 months postpartum were allocated evenly to two groups. The cows in ISS grazed in paddocks of Leucaena leucocephala associated with Cynodon nlemfuensis whereas the cows in MS grazed in C. nlemfuensis. Milk samples were collected weekly during the rainy and dry seasons for chemical analysis and fresh soft cheese making. The cheese was analyzed chemically, and cheese acceptability was evaluated for the sensory attributes of appearance, texture, flavor, color, and overall acceptability. Milk percentages of fat, protein, SNF, and lactose did not differ significantly between systems being, 3.5, 3.0, 8.1, and 4.4 in ISS and 3.6, 2.9, 8.0, and 4.4 in MS, respectively. Similar results were obtained for cheese content of fat/DM and protein/DM. In the rainy season, adjusted cheese yield from ISS (24.2%) was higher compared with MS (20.8%). Cheese texture in the dry season showed more acceptability for ISS. This study provide absence of adverse effect of ISS on milk and cheese composition; moreover, ISS improve the yield and acceptability of soft cheese. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Dairy Science & Technology Springer Journals

Evaluation of milk composition and fresh soft cheese from an intensive silvopastoral system in the tropics

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 by INRA and Springer-Verlag France
Subject
Chemistry; Food Science; Agriculture; Microbiology
ISSN
1958-5586
eISSN
1958-5594
DOI
10.1007/s13594-015-0251-4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Intensive silvopastoral system (ISS) is a successful sustainable grazing system for dual-purpose cattle with growing adoption in the tropics; however, there is a concern on the quality of dairy products from this system. The aim of this study was to compare the ISS with the traditional monoculture system (MS) in terms of milk composition, soft cheese composition and yield, and the sensory acceptability of cheese during two seasons of a tropical area in Mexico. Twenty-four cows at the first 3 months postpartum were allocated evenly to two groups. The cows in ISS grazed in paddocks of Leucaena leucocephala associated with Cynodon nlemfuensis whereas the cows in MS grazed in C. nlemfuensis. Milk samples were collected weekly during the rainy and dry seasons for chemical analysis and fresh soft cheese making. The cheese was analyzed chemically, and cheese acceptability was evaluated for the sensory attributes of appearance, texture, flavor, color, and overall acceptability. Milk percentages of fat, protein, SNF, and lactose did not differ significantly between systems being, 3.5, 3.0, 8.1, and 4.4 in ISS and 3.6, 2.9, 8.0, and 4.4 in MS, respectively. Similar results were obtained for cheese content of fat/DM and protein/DM. In the rainy season, adjusted cheese yield from ISS (24.2%) was higher compared with MS (20.8%). Cheese texture in the dry season showed more acceptability for ISS. This study provide absence of adverse effect of ISS on milk and cheese composition; moreover, ISS improve the yield and acceptability of soft cheese.

Journal

Dairy Science & TechnologySpringer Journals

Published: Aug 17, 2015

References