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Estimating Mammalian Abundance Using Camera Traps in the Tropical Forest of Similipal Tiger Reserve, Odisha, India

Estimating Mammalian Abundance Using Camera Traps in the Tropical Forest of Similipal Tiger... Knowledge on the occurrence and distribution of species is crucial for designing and evaluating conservation strategies within a geographical region. Similipal Tiger Reserve though confined to a small area needs information on the diversity and abundance of mammalian fauna to ensure conservation of tiger. Thus, we aimed to assess the diversity and abundance of medium to large sized mammals in Similipal Tiger Reserve by using remotely triggered camera traps. A total of 6413 camera trap days at 187 trap stations were deployed from November 2012 to July 2013 to estimate the status of mammal. We obtained 3763 independent photographs and detected 24 species of mammals. The relative abundance index of each mammalian species was calculated. Leopard (Panthera pardus) was the most abundant carnivore while barking deer (Muntiacus muntjac) was the most abundant prey. Anthropogenic activities like hunting, livestock grazing and free ranging domestic dogs were found to be the detrimental factors for the existing mammalian species. These activities should be addressed through conservation and development perception with an interdisciplinary approach, incorporating social and ecological components cautiously. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Proceedings of the Zoological Society Springer Journals

Estimating Mammalian Abundance Using Camera Traps in the Tropical Forest of Similipal Tiger Reserve, Odisha, India

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 by Zoological Society, Kolkata, India
Subject
Life Sciences; Life Sciences, general; Zoology; Animal Anatomy / Morphology / Histology; Animal Genetics and Genomics; Biodiversity; Conservation Biology/Ecology
ISSN
0373-5893
eISSN
0974-6919
DOI
10.1007/s12595-015-0143-x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Knowledge on the occurrence and distribution of species is crucial for designing and evaluating conservation strategies within a geographical region. Similipal Tiger Reserve though confined to a small area needs information on the diversity and abundance of mammalian fauna to ensure conservation of tiger. Thus, we aimed to assess the diversity and abundance of medium to large sized mammals in Similipal Tiger Reserve by using remotely triggered camera traps. A total of 6413 camera trap days at 187 trap stations were deployed from November 2012 to July 2013 to estimate the status of mammal. We obtained 3763 independent photographs and detected 24 species of mammals. The relative abundance index of each mammalian species was calculated. Leopard (Panthera pardus) was the most abundant carnivore while barking deer (Muntiacus muntjac) was the most abundant prey. Anthropogenic activities like hunting, livestock grazing and free ranging domestic dogs were found to be the detrimental factors for the existing mammalian species. These activities should be addressed through conservation and development perception with an interdisciplinary approach, incorporating social and ecological components cautiously.

Journal

Proceedings of the Zoological SocietySpringer Journals

Published: Mar 27, 2015

References