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Enhancement of protein structure-forming properties in liquid foams by spray drying

Enhancement of protein structure-forming properties in liquid foams by spray drying In the first part of this study we used mathematical modelling for prediction of hydrothermal pathways (time evolution of temperature and water content) of a whey protein-rich product during its spray drying in a co-current configuration. The model was validated through drying assays, where the inlet/outlet air temperatures were fixed at 170/85 °C, 217/107 °C, 247/125 °C or 260/138 °C, the other spray-drying operation variables being unchanged. Then, the spray-dried powders were characterised before and after re-hydration for evaluation of a threshold air operating temperature value leading to changes in protein structure-functionality, in comparison with the nonspray-dried protein solution (WP-L). The predicted hydro-thermal pathways of the whey proteinrich product during its spray drying indicated that all of the operation variables used were accompanied by a product wet bulb temperature value lower than 60 °C. However, the resulting powders presented different internal porosity and wall thickness, and the protein solutions obtained after the powders’ re-hydration behaved differently from the non-spray-dried protein solution (WP-L). Particularly, it seemed that powders obtained at outlet air temperature and water content higher than 100 °C and lower than 4%, respectively, presented a higher internal porosity and lower free lactose content. Furthermore, they were accompanied by lower protein solubility and conformation stability and by a slight development of hydroxymethylfurfural and covalently-bound protein aggregates. In addition, in situ evaluation of foam formation and stability after air injection into the re-hydrated powders showed that increasing spray-drying air temperatures led to powders with more and more enhanced foaming properties, relative to the whey protein-rich solution before spray drying. The powder characteristics obtained in the present study, added to those recently published [Relkin et al., Lait 87 (2007) 337–348] are presented and discussed in regards to effects of spray-drying operation variables on protein structural changes and enhancement of foaming properties without additional processing equipment. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Dairy Science & Technology Springer Journals

Enhancement of protein structure-forming properties in liquid foams by spray drying

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 by Springer S+B Media B.V.
Subject
Chemistry; Food Science; Agriculture; Microbiology
ISSN
1958-5586
eISSN
1958-5594
DOI
10.1051/dst:2007017
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In the first part of this study we used mathematical modelling for prediction of hydrothermal pathways (time evolution of temperature and water content) of a whey protein-rich product during its spray drying in a co-current configuration. The model was validated through drying assays, where the inlet/outlet air temperatures were fixed at 170/85 °C, 217/107 °C, 247/125 °C or 260/138 °C, the other spray-drying operation variables being unchanged. Then, the spray-dried powders were characterised before and after re-hydration for evaluation of a threshold air operating temperature value leading to changes in protein structure-functionality, in comparison with the nonspray-dried protein solution (WP-L). The predicted hydro-thermal pathways of the whey proteinrich product during its spray drying indicated that all of the operation variables used were accompanied by a product wet bulb temperature value lower than 60 °C. However, the resulting powders presented different internal porosity and wall thickness, and the protein solutions obtained after the powders’ re-hydration behaved differently from the non-spray-dried protein solution (WP-L). Particularly, it seemed that powders obtained at outlet air temperature and water content higher than 100 °C and lower than 4%, respectively, presented a higher internal porosity and lower free lactose content. Furthermore, they were accompanied by lower protein solubility and conformation stability and by a slight development of hydroxymethylfurfural and covalently-bound protein aggregates. In addition, in situ evaluation of foam formation and stability after air injection into the re-hydrated powders showed that increasing spray-drying air temperatures led to powders with more and more enhanced foaming properties, relative to the whey protein-rich solution before spray drying. The powder characteristics obtained in the present study, added to those recently published [Relkin et al., Lait 87 (2007) 337–348] are presented and discussed in regards to effects of spray-drying operation variables on protein structural changes and enhancement of foaming properties without additional processing equipment.

Journal

Dairy Science & TechnologySpringer Journals

Published: May 21, 2011

References