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Efficacy of Chlorine Dioxide Gas Against Hepatitis A Virus on Blueberries, Blackberries, Raspberries, and Strawberries

Efficacy of Chlorine Dioxide Gas Against Hepatitis A Virus on Blueberries, Blackberries,... Seeking a means of sanitizing berries, the effectiveness of steady state levels of gaseous chlorine dioxide (ClO2) against hepatitis A virus (HAV) on laboratory-contaminated berries was determined. The generated ClO2 was maintained with 1 or 2 mg/l air inside a 269-l glove box to treat 50 g batches of blueberries, raspberries, and blackberries, and 100 g batches of strawberries that were immersion coated with HAV. Normalized data for ClO2 (ppm-h/g product) is reported as a function of ClO2 concentration, treatment time, and weight of treated product. Treatments of ClO2 ranging from 1.00 to 6.27 ppm-h/g berry were evaluated. When compared to untreated HAV-contaminated berries, log reductions of HAV were > 2.1 for all berry types and conditions tested indicating the gaseous ClO2 was effective. The average log reduction with strawberries, raspberries, blueberries and blackberries treated with 1.00 ppm-h/g, the lowest ClO2 treatment tested, were 2.44, 2.49, 3.23, and 3.45, respectively. The highest treatment of 6.27 ppm-h/g was applied at two different gas concentrations of 1 mg/l and 2 mg/l. Average log reductions for blueberries and strawberries treated with 6.27 ppm-h/g were 4.34 and 4.42, and 4.03 and 3.51, applied at 1 mg/l and 2 mg/l, respectively. For blackberries and raspberries 3.20 and 3.24, and 3.23 and 3.97 log reductions were observed for 6.27 ppm-h/g treatments applied at 1 mg/l and 2 mg/l, respectively. Results indicate that HAV contamination of berries can be substantially reduced by gaseous ClO2 and offer industry a waterless means of sanitizing berries against HAV. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Food and Environmental Virology Springer Journals

Efficacy of Chlorine Dioxide Gas Against Hepatitis A Virus on Blueberries, Blackberries, Raspberries, and Strawberries

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © This is a U.S. government work and not under copyright protection in the U.S.; foreign copyright protection may apply 2021
ISSN
1867-0334
eISSN
1867-0342
DOI
10.1007/s12560-021-09465-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Seeking a means of sanitizing berries, the effectiveness of steady state levels of gaseous chlorine dioxide (ClO2) against hepatitis A virus (HAV) on laboratory-contaminated berries was determined. The generated ClO2 was maintained with 1 or 2 mg/l air inside a 269-l glove box to treat 50 g batches of blueberries, raspberries, and blackberries, and 100 g batches of strawberries that were immersion coated with HAV. Normalized data for ClO2 (ppm-h/g product) is reported as a function of ClO2 concentration, treatment time, and weight of treated product. Treatments of ClO2 ranging from 1.00 to 6.27 ppm-h/g berry were evaluated. When compared to untreated HAV-contaminated berries, log reductions of HAV were > 2.1 for all berry types and conditions tested indicating the gaseous ClO2 was effective. The average log reduction with strawberries, raspberries, blueberries and blackberries treated with 1.00 ppm-h/g, the lowest ClO2 treatment tested, were 2.44, 2.49, 3.23, and 3.45, respectively. The highest treatment of 6.27 ppm-h/g was applied at two different gas concentrations of 1 mg/l and 2 mg/l. Average log reductions for blueberries and strawberries treated with 6.27 ppm-h/g were 4.34 and 4.42, and 4.03 and 3.51, applied at 1 mg/l and 2 mg/l, respectively. For blackberries and raspberries 3.20 and 3.24, and 3.23 and 3.97 log reductions were observed for 6.27 ppm-h/g treatments applied at 1 mg/l and 2 mg/l, respectively. Results indicate that HAV contamination of berries can be substantially reduced by gaseous ClO2 and offer industry a waterless means of sanitizing berries against HAV.

Journal

Food and Environmental VirologySpringer Journals

Published: Mar 10, 2021

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