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Effect of elevated temperature on mechanical properties of early-age concrete

Effect of elevated temperature on mechanical properties of early-age concrete This paper reports the laboratory measurement of ultrasonic pulse velocity and compressive strength on early-age concrete exposed to elevated temperature. Concrete specimens were cast with 0.5 and 0.6 water–cement ratios and cured for 3, 7 and 28 days. After each curing period, samples were exposed to peak temperatures of 400 °C, 600 °C and 800 °C in the electric muffle furnace and cooled down to the normal temperature by using air cooling and quenching. Ultrasonic wave velocity was produced using a standard ultrasonic pulse velocity tester. The compressive strength was determined by crushing the samples. It was observed that the water–cement ratio affects the pulse velocity and strength of concrete subjected to elevated temperature. Recovery in strength and pulse velocity was found for the first seven days of post-fire curing. Maximum recovery after 28 days post-fire water curing was observed in the concrete sample heated at the age of 3 days and cooled down to the normal temperature by the method of air cooling. Correlations between pulse velocity and strength were suggested which can be used as a nondestructive practice to evaluate the residual compressive strength ratio quantitatively. However, the relationship is strongly dependent on the moisture condition of the concrete. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Innovative Infrastructure Solutions Springer Journals

Effect of elevated temperature on mechanical properties of early-age concrete

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 by Springer Nature Switzerland AG
Subject
Earth Sciences; Geotechnical Engineering & Applied Earth Sciences; Environmental Science and Engineering; Geoengineering, Foundations, Hydraulics
ISSN
2364-4176
eISSN
2364-4184
DOI
10.1007/s41062-019-0254-8
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper reports the laboratory measurement of ultrasonic pulse velocity and compressive strength on early-age concrete exposed to elevated temperature. Concrete specimens were cast with 0.5 and 0.6 water–cement ratios and cured for 3, 7 and 28 days. After each curing period, samples were exposed to peak temperatures of 400 °C, 600 °C and 800 °C in the electric muffle furnace and cooled down to the normal temperature by using air cooling and quenching. Ultrasonic wave velocity was produced using a standard ultrasonic pulse velocity tester. The compressive strength was determined by crushing the samples. It was observed that the water–cement ratio affects the pulse velocity and strength of concrete subjected to elevated temperature. Recovery in strength and pulse velocity was found for the first seven days of post-fire curing. Maximum recovery after 28 days post-fire water curing was observed in the concrete sample heated at the age of 3 days and cooled down to the normal temperature by the method of air cooling. Correlations between pulse velocity and strength were suggested which can be used as a nondestructive practice to evaluate the residual compressive strength ratio quantitatively. However, the relationship is strongly dependent on the moisture condition of the concrete.

Journal

Innovative Infrastructure SolutionsSpringer Journals

Published: Dec 16, 2019

References