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Editorial for special issue on Job Tasks and Labour Studies

Editorial for special issue on Job Tasks and Labour Studies J Labour Market Res (2016) 49:97–98 DOI 10.1007/s12651-016-0212-2 EDITORIAL 1 2 Francis Green · Michael Handel Published online: 5 September 2016 © The Author(s) 2016. This article is available at SpringerLink with Open Access. Recent years have witnessed increasing interest in the value this issue we include five papers that utilise job require- of job requirements data for understanding a range of eco- ments data from Germany, the UK, Spain and the US, nomic outcomes, including the changing composition of demonstrating the versatility of a task-based approach to employment (characterised in some countries by an asym- studying the deployment of labour. metric polarisation), rising earnings inequalities, occupa- In Germany, Rohrbach-Schmidt and Tiemann utilise the tional mobility, and the relationships between technologi- BIBB/BauA Employment Survey from 2006 to analyse ed- cal change, organisational change and workforce skills (e. g. ucational and skills mismatches. The former are measured Autor et al. 2003; Spitz-Oener 2006; Acemoglu and Autor using the comparison between achieved education level and 2011; Green 2012). This research agenda has been stim- workers’ reports of the required education level. The latter ulated by the collection of task-related data in a number is measured by a subjective indicator of over- http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal for Labour Market Research Springer Journals

Editorial for special issue on Job Tasks and Labour Studies

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References (5)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 by The Author(s)
Subject
Economics; Labor Economics; Sociology, general; Human Resource Management; Economic Policy; Regional/Spatial Science; Population Economics
ISSN
1614-3485
eISSN
1867-8343
DOI
10.1007/s12651-016-0212-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

J Labour Market Res (2016) 49:97–98 DOI 10.1007/s12651-016-0212-2 EDITORIAL 1 2 Francis Green · Michael Handel Published online: 5 September 2016 © The Author(s) 2016. This article is available at SpringerLink with Open Access. Recent years have witnessed increasing interest in the value this issue we include five papers that utilise job require- of job requirements data for understanding a range of eco- ments data from Germany, the UK, Spain and the US, nomic outcomes, including the changing composition of demonstrating the versatility of a task-based approach to employment (characterised in some countries by an asym- studying the deployment of labour. metric polarisation), rising earnings inequalities, occupa- In Germany, Rohrbach-Schmidt and Tiemann utilise the tional mobility, and the relationships between technologi- BIBB/BauA Employment Survey from 2006 to analyse ed- cal change, organisational change and workforce skills (e. g. ucational and skills mismatches. The former are measured Autor et al. 2003; Spitz-Oener 2006; Acemoglu and Autor using the comparison between achieved education level and 2011; Green 2012). This research agenda has been stim- workers’ reports of the required education level. The latter ulated by the collection of task-related data in a number is measured by a subjective indicator of over-

Journal

Journal for Labour Market ResearchSpringer Journals

Published: Sep 5, 2016

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