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Edge-Centered DTI Connectivity Analysis: Application to Schizophrenia

Edge-Centered DTI Connectivity Analysis: Application to Schizophrenia Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) provides connectivity information that helps illuminate the processes underlying normal development as well as brain disorders such as autism and schizophrenia. Researchers have widely adopted graph representations to model DTI connectivity among brain structures; however, most measures of connectivity have been centered on nodes, rather than edges, in these graphs. We present an edge-based algorithm for assessing anatomic connectivity; this approach provides information about connections among brain structures, rather than information about structures themselves. This perspective allows us to formulate multivariate graph-based models of altered connectivity that distinguish among experimental groups. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by analyzing data from an ongoing study of schizophrenia. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Neuroinformatics Springer Journals

Edge-Centered DTI Connectivity Analysis: Application to Schizophrenia

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 by Springer Science+Business Media New York
Subject
Biomedicine; Neurosciences; Bioinformatics; Computational Biology/Bioinformatics; Computer Appl. in Life Sciences; Neurology
ISSN
1539-2791
eISSN
1559-0089
DOI
10.1007/s12021-015-9273-6
pmid
26078102
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) provides connectivity information that helps illuminate the processes underlying normal development as well as brain disorders such as autism and schizophrenia. Researchers have widely adopted graph representations to model DTI connectivity among brain structures; however, most measures of connectivity have been centered on nodes, rather than edges, in these graphs. We present an edge-based algorithm for assessing anatomic connectivity; this approach provides information about connections among brain structures, rather than information about structures themselves. This perspective allows us to formulate multivariate graph-based models of altered connectivity that distinguish among experimental groups. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by analyzing data from an ongoing study of schizophrenia.

Journal

NeuroinformaticsSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 16, 2015

References