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Early Melanoma Detection in Primary Care: Clinical Recognition of Melanoma is Not Enough, One Must Also Learn the Basics

Early Melanoma Detection in Primary Care: Clinical Recognition of Melanoma is Not Enough, One... To improve early melanoma detection, educational programs have been developed for general practitioners (GPs). This study aimed to determine whether the adjunct of teaching basic knowledge of pigmented skin lesions (PSL) to the training in melanoma diagnosis improves the GPs’ diagnostic accuracy of melanoma. An interventional prospective study was conducted over a 3-month period where GPs attended a 2-h training course. The 1st session taught clinical melanoma recognition and the 2nd session instructed basic knowledge of PSL. Prior to training, after the 1st, and after the 2nd session, GPs were asked to select the malignant or benign nature of 15 clinical images associated to their clinical history. In total, 56 GPs participated in this study. The number of GPs identifying correctly ≥ 50% of the melanomas increased the most after the 1st session from 15 (26.8%; CI = (15.2; 38.4)) to 44 (78.6%; CI = (67.8; 89.3)) GPs (P < 0.001). The number of GPs correctly identifying ≥ 50% of the benign PSL only increased after completing the entire training, going from 10 (17.9%; CI = [(7.8; 27.9)) GPs to 50 (89.3%; CI = (81.2; 97.4)) GPs (P < 0.001). In this study, GPs identified benign PSL most accurately after the 2nd session. This suggested that teaching GPs the basics of PSL would especially improve their diagnostic accuracy for benign PSL, which could reduce unnecessary referrals to dermatologists. Teaching basic knowledge of PSL in addition to melanoma recognition seemed to enable GPs to triage skin lesions more effectively than when they were only trained to recognize melanoma. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Cancer Education Springer Journals

Early Melanoma Detection in Primary Care: Clinical Recognition of Melanoma is Not Enough, One Must Also Learn the Basics

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © American Association for Cancer Education 2020
ISSN
0885-8195
eISSN
1543-0154
DOI
10.1007/s13187-020-01897-w
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

To improve early melanoma detection, educational programs have been developed for general practitioners (GPs). This study aimed to determine whether the adjunct of teaching basic knowledge of pigmented skin lesions (PSL) to the training in melanoma diagnosis improves the GPs’ diagnostic accuracy of melanoma. An interventional prospective study was conducted over a 3-month period where GPs attended a 2-h training course. The 1st session taught clinical melanoma recognition and the 2nd session instructed basic knowledge of PSL. Prior to training, after the 1st, and after the 2nd session, GPs were asked to select the malignant or benign nature of 15 clinical images associated to their clinical history. In total, 56 GPs participated in this study. The number of GPs identifying correctly ≥ 50% of the melanomas increased the most after the 1st session from 15 (26.8%; CI = (15.2; 38.4)) to 44 (78.6%; CI = (67.8; 89.3)) GPs (P < 0.001). The number of GPs correctly identifying ≥ 50% of the benign PSL only increased after completing the entire training, going from 10 (17.9%; CI = [(7.8; 27.9)) GPs to 50 (89.3%; CI = (81.2; 97.4)) GPs (P < 0.001). In this study, GPs identified benign PSL most accurately after the 2nd session. This suggested that teaching GPs the basics of PSL would especially improve their diagnostic accuracy for benign PSL, which could reduce unnecessary referrals to dermatologists. Teaching basic knowledge of PSL in addition to melanoma recognition seemed to enable GPs to triage skin lesions more effectively than when they were only trained to recognize melanoma.

Journal

Journal of Cancer EducationSpringer Journals

Published: Aug 1, 2022

Keywords: Continuing medical education; General practitioner; Melanoma; Early cancer detection

References