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Drugs and Breast Cancer–Related Lymphoedema (BCRL): Incidence and Progression

Drugs and Breast Cancer–Related Lymphoedema (BCRL): Incidence and Progression Purpose of ReviewWhat is the current evidence for the role of drugs as risk factors for the development of breast cancer–related lymphoedema (BCRL) and in exacerbating existing BCRL? What are the mechanisms by which these effects occur?Recent FindingsThere is now evidence that taking calcium channel blockers (CCBs) during and after breast cancer treatment and receiving docetaxel chemotherapy are risk factors for the development of BCRL. CCBs cause oedema by increasing capillary filtration and docetaxel by inhibiting lymphatic vessel contractions.SummaryIdeally, CCBs should be avoided during and after treatment for breast cancer, but alternative options include changing to CCBs with a lower risk of causing oedema. An awareness of the potential role of medications in increasing the risk of BCRL and exacerbating existing BCRL is important in the appropriate management of patients treated for breast cancer. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Current Breast Cancer Reports Springer Journals

Drugs and Breast Cancer–Related Lymphoedema (BCRL): Incidence and Progression

Current Breast Cancer Reports , Volume 12 (4) – Aug 14, 2020

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2020
ISSN
1943-4588
eISSN
1943-4596
DOI
10.1007/s12609-020-00379-8
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose of ReviewWhat is the current evidence for the role of drugs as risk factors for the development of breast cancer–related lymphoedema (BCRL) and in exacerbating existing BCRL? What are the mechanisms by which these effects occur?Recent FindingsThere is now evidence that taking calcium channel blockers (CCBs) during and after breast cancer treatment and receiving docetaxel chemotherapy are risk factors for the development of BCRL. CCBs cause oedema by increasing capillary filtration and docetaxel by inhibiting lymphatic vessel contractions.SummaryIdeally, CCBs should be avoided during and after treatment for breast cancer, but alternative options include changing to CCBs with a lower risk of causing oedema. An awareness of the potential role of medications in increasing the risk of BCRL and exacerbating existing BCRL is important in the appropriate management of patients treated for breast cancer.

Journal

Current Breast Cancer ReportsSpringer Journals

Published: Aug 14, 2020

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