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Does mismeasurement explain low productivity growth?

Does mismeasurement explain low productivity growth? Abstract The “mismeasurement hypothesis” holds that the recent slowdown in recorded productivity growth merely reflects a fall-off in our ability to measure productivity rather than an actual deceleration in economic growth, in large part reflecting benefits people gain, but don’t pay for, from using new technology applications. If this hypothesis is valid, we should see that national drops in productivity growth are connected to usage of these services, we should be able to ascertain large gains in surplus related to them, growth in the technology sector should be sharply understated, and labor incomes should be swelling relative to output. None of these arenas show evidence that recent miscounts of aggregate productivity are notably large compared to the past. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Business Economics Springer Journals

Does mismeasurement explain low productivity growth?

Business Economics , Volume 52 (2): 4 – Apr 1, 2017

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
2017 National Association for Business Economics
ISSN
0007-666X
eISSN
1554-432X
DOI
10.1057/s11369-017-0024-6
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract The “mismeasurement hypothesis” holds that the recent slowdown in recorded productivity growth merely reflects a fall-off in our ability to measure productivity rather than an actual deceleration in economic growth, in large part reflecting benefits people gain, but don’t pay for, from using new technology applications. If this hypothesis is valid, we should see that national drops in productivity growth are connected to usage of these services, we should be able to ascertain large gains in surplus related to them, growth in the technology sector should be sharply understated, and labor incomes should be swelling relative to output. None of these arenas show evidence that recent miscounts of aggregate productivity are notably large compared to the past.

Journal

Business EconomicsSpringer Journals

Published: Apr 1, 2017

References