Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

“Do You Smoke?” Physician–Patient Conversations About Smoking and Lung Cancer

“Do You Smoke?” Physician–Patient Conversations About Smoking and Lung Cancer This study examined how physicians initiated and navigated conversations about smoking with patients with lung cancer. While there are numerous health benefits associated with smoking cessation in patients with advanced lung cancer, conversations about smoking cessation are infrequent and often lack tangible cessation support. We conducted a qualitative inductive content analysis on transcripts of conversations (n = 58) recorded during an initial appointment between a physician and a standardized patient (SP). SPs portrayed a 62-year-old male with lung cancer completing an initial visit with a new physician. Qualitative analysis focused on examining how physicians discussed smoking with a new patient. We found that a majority of physicians initiated conversations about smoking, often during the medical history charting process or during conversations about the lung cancer diagnosis. The content of conversations about smoking generally fits within six categories: assesses smoking status, builds smoking history profile, praises smoking cessation, connects smoking behaviors to diagnosis or treatment, provides empathy or understanding, and presents a negative bias about smoking. We found that while a majority of physicians asked patients about smoking, most physicians aimed for these conversations to be short, routine, and medically driven. Conversations about smoking were not tailored to meet the specific needs of patients with lung cancer, which might include additional provision of support for smoking cessation and recognition of smoking-related stigma. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Cancer Education Springer Journals

“Do You Smoke?” Physician–Patient Conversations About Smoking and Lung Cancer

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/do-you-smoke-physician-patient-conversations-about-smoking-and-lung-r2RYhYwGRH
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © American Association for Cancer Education 2021
ISSN
0885-8195
eISSN
1543-0154
DOI
10.1007/s13187-021-02067-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study examined how physicians initiated and navigated conversations about smoking with patients with lung cancer. While there are numerous health benefits associated with smoking cessation in patients with advanced lung cancer, conversations about smoking cessation are infrequent and often lack tangible cessation support. We conducted a qualitative inductive content analysis on transcripts of conversations (n = 58) recorded during an initial appointment between a physician and a standardized patient (SP). SPs portrayed a 62-year-old male with lung cancer completing an initial visit with a new physician. Qualitative analysis focused on examining how physicians discussed smoking with a new patient. We found that a majority of physicians initiated conversations about smoking, often during the medical history charting process or during conversations about the lung cancer diagnosis. The content of conversations about smoking generally fits within six categories: assesses smoking status, builds smoking history profile, praises smoking cessation, connects smoking behaviors to diagnosis or treatment, provides empathy or understanding, and presents a negative bias about smoking. We found that while a majority of physicians asked patients about smoking, most physicians aimed for these conversations to be short, routine, and medically driven. Conversations about smoking were not tailored to meet the specific needs of patients with lung cancer, which might include additional provision of support for smoking cessation and recognition of smoking-related stigma.

Journal

Journal of Cancer EducationSpringer Journals

Published: Dec 1, 2022

Keywords: Lung cancer; Smoking; Smoking cessation; Stigma; Patient-physician communication

References