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Distribution of Naturally Occurring Norovirus Genogroups I, II, and IV in Oyster Tissues

Distribution of Naturally Occurring Norovirus Genogroups I, II, and IV in Oyster Tissues This study evaluated different tissues of naturally contaminated oysters (Crassostrea belcheri) for the presence of noroviruses. RNA from digestive tissues, gills, and mantle of the oysters was extracted and tested for norovirus genogroup (G) I, GII, and GIV using RT-nested PCR. In spiking experiments with a known norovirus, GII.4, the detection limits were 2.97 × 102 RNA copies/g of digestive tissues, 2.62 × 102 RNA copies/g of gills, and 1.61 × 103 RNA copies/g of mantle. A total of 85 oyster samples were collected from a fresh market in Bangkok, Thailand. Noroviruses were found in the oyster samples (40/85, 47%): GI (29/85, 34.1%), GII (9/85, 10.5%), mixed GI and GII (1/85, 1.2%), and GIV (1/85, 1.2%). All three genogroups were found in the digestive tissues of oysters. Norovirus GI was present in all three tissues with the highest frequency in the mantle, and was additionally detected in multiple tissues in some oysters. GII was also detected in all three tissues, but was not detected in multiple tissues in the same oyster. For genogroup I, only GI.2 could be identified and it was found in all tissues. For genogroup II, three different genotypes were identified, namely GII.4 which was detected in the gills and the mantle, GII.17 which was detected in the digestive tissues, and GII.21 which was detected in the mantle. GIV.1 was identified in the digestive tissues of one oyster. This is the first report on the presence of human GIV.1 in oyster in Thailand, and the results indicate oyster as a possible vehicle for transmission of all norovirus genogroups in Thailand. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Food and Environmental Virology Springer Journals

Distribution of Naturally Occurring Norovirus Genogroups I, II, and IV in Oyster Tissues

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer Science+Business Media New York
Subject
Biomedicine; Virology; Food Science; Chemistry/Food Science, general
ISSN
1867-0334
eISSN
1867-0342
DOI
10.1007/s12560-017-9305-5
pmid
28550646
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study evaluated different tissues of naturally contaminated oysters (Crassostrea belcheri) for the presence of noroviruses. RNA from digestive tissues, gills, and mantle of the oysters was extracted and tested for norovirus genogroup (G) I, GII, and GIV using RT-nested PCR. In spiking experiments with a known norovirus, GII.4, the detection limits were 2.97 × 102 RNA copies/g of digestive tissues, 2.62 × 102 RNA copies/g of gills, and 1.61 × 103 RNA copies/g of mantle. A total of 85 oyster samples were collected from a fresh market in Bangkok, Thailand. Noroviruses were found in the oyster samples (40/85, 47%): GI (29/85, 34.1%), GII (9/85, 10.5%), mixed GI and GII (1/85, 1.2%), and GIV (1/85, 1.2%). All three genogroups were found in the digestive tissues of oysters. Norovirus GI was present in all three tissues with the highest frequency in the mantle, and was additionally detected in multiple tissues in some oysters. GII was also detected in all three tissues, but was not detected in multiple tissues in the same oyster. For genogroup I, only GI.2 could be identified and it was found in all tissues. For genogroup II, three different genotypes were identified, namely GII.4 which was detected in the gills and the mantle, GII.17 which was detected in the digestive tissues, and GII.21 which was detected in the mantle. GIV.1 was identified in the digestive tissues of one oyster. This is the first report on the presence of human GIV.1 in oyster in Thailand, and the results indicate oyster as a possible vehicle for transmission of all norovirus genogroups in Thailand.

Journal

Food and Environmental VirologySpringer Journals

Published: May 26, 2017

References