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Distinct Functional States of Astrocytes During Sleep and Wakefulness: Is Norepinephrine the Master Regulator?

Distinct Functional States of Astrocytes During Sleep and Wakefulness: Is Norepinephrine the... Astrocytes are the chief supportive cells in the central nervous system, but work over the past 20 years have documented that astrocytes also contribute to complex neural processes, such as working memory. Recent discoveries of norepinephrine-mediated astrocytic Ca2+ responses have raised the possibility that astrocytic activity in the adult brain is driven by global responses to changes in behavioral state. Moreover, analysis of the interstitial space volume suggests that astrocytes may undergo changes in cell volume in response to activation of norepinephrine receptors. This review will focus on what is known about astrocytic functions within the nervous system and how these functions interrelate with rapid changes in behavioral state mediated by norepinephrine signaling. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Current Sleep Medicine Reports Springer Journals

Distinct Functional States of Astrocytes During Sleep and Wakefulness: Is Norepinephrine the Master Regulator?

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 by Springer International Publishing AG
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Internal Medicine; General Practice / Family Medicine; Otorhinolaryngology; Neurology; Cardiology; Psychiatry
eISSN
2198-6401
DOI
10.1007/s40675-014-0004-6
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Astrocytes are the chief supportive cells in the central nervous system, but work over the past 20 years have documented that astrocytes also contribute to complex neural processes, such as working memory. Recent discoveries of norepinephrine-mediated astrocytic Ca2+ responses have raised the possibility that astrocytic activity in the adult brain is driven by global responses to changes in behavioral state. Moreover, analysis of the interstitial space volume suggests that astrocytes may undergo changes in cell volume in response to activation of norepinephrine receptors. This review will focus on what is known about astrocytic functions within the nervous system and how these functions interrelate with rapid changes in behavioral state mediated by norepinephrine signaling.

Journal

Current Sleep Medicine ReportsSpringer Journals

Published: Jan 29, 2015

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