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Discussion of “Horneyan developmental psychoanalytic theory and its application to the treatment of the young”

Discussion of “Horneyan developmental psychoanalytic theory and its application to the treatment... DISCUSSION OF "HORNEYAN DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOANALYTIC THEORY AND ITS APPLICATION TO THE TREATMENT OF THE YOUNG" Douglas H. Ingram In the following, I will present a clinical case illustrating the ideas dis- cussed by Dr. Paul in his paper. First, I wish to emphasize the underlying position held in common by these two monumental thinkers, Drs. Karen Horney and John Bowlby. Essentially, both writers view mental disorder as an effort at coping with an environment experienced as hostile. These words of Dr. Bowlby will seem entirely compatible to Homey theorists: "Psychopathology is regarded as due to a person's psychological develop- ment having followed a deviant pathway, and not as due to his suffering a fixation at, or a regression to, some early stage of development" (I, p. 41). Like Fairbairn, Homey and Bowlby regard psychopathology as arising in response to adverse influences in the environment. These adverse influ- ences produce, first, anxiety; only secondarily does hostility to the world develop. This differs from the view held by Melanie Klein in which inner hostility is primary and anxiety seen as fear of retribution. How might similarities in the work of Bowlby and Homey emerge in a specific clinical case? Serendipitously, I http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The American Journal of Psychoanalysis Springer Journals

Discussion of “Horneyan developmental psychoanalytic theory and its application to the treatment of the young”

The American Journal of Psychoanalysis , Volume 44 (1): 6 – Mar 1, 1984

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
1984 Association for the Advancement of Psychoanalysis
ISSN
0002-9548
eISSN
1573-6741
DOI
10.1007/BF01255421
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

DISCUSSION OF "HORNEYAN DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOANALYTIC THEORY AND ITS APPLICATION TO THE TREATMENT OF THE YOUNG" Douglas H. Ingram In the following, I will present a clinical case illustrating the ideas dis- cussed by Dr. Paul in his paper. First, I wish to emphasize the underlying position held in common by these two monumental thinkers, Drs. Karen Horney and John Bowlby. Essentially, both writers view mental disorder as an effort at coping with an environment experienced as hostile. These words of Dr. Bowlby will seem entirely compatible to Homey theorists: "Psychopathology is regarded as due to a person's psychological develop- ment having followed a deviant pathway, and not as due to his suffering a fixation at, or a regression to, some early stage of development" (I, p. 41). Like Fairbairn, Homey and Bowlby regard psychopathology as arising in response to adverse influences in the environment. These adverse influ- ences produce, first, anxiety; only secondarily does hostility to the world develop. This differs from the view held by Melanie Klein in which inner hostility is primary and anxiety seen as fear of retribution. How might similarities in the work of Bowlby and Homey emerge in a specific clinical case? Serendipitously, I

Journal

The American Journal of PsychoanalysisSpringer Journals

Published: Mar 1, 1984

References