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Disclosure Strategies for Pollution Control

Disclosure Strategies for Pollution Control Disclosure strategies, which involve public and/or private attempts to increase the availability of information on pollution, form the basis for what some have called the third wave in pollution control policy (after legal regulation – the first wave – and market-based instruments – the second wave). While these strategies have become common in natural resource settings (forest certification and organic farming, for example), they are less familiar in a pollution control context. Yet the number of applications in that context is now growing in both OECD and developing countries. This survey will review what we know and don’t know about the use of disclosure strategies to control pollution and conclude with the author's sense of where further research would be particularly helpful. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environmental and Resource Economics Springer Journals

Disclosure Strategies for Pollution Control

Environmental and Resource Economics , Volume 11 (4) – Oct 23, 2004

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References (40)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Economics; Environmental Economics; Environmental Law/Policy/Ecojustice; Economic Policy; Economics, general; Environmental Management
ISSN
0924-6460
eISSN
1573-1502
DOI
10.1023/A:1008291411492
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Disclosure strategies, which involve public and/or private attempts to increase the availability of information on pollution, form the basis for what some have called the third wave in pollution control policy (after legal regulation – the first wave – and market-based instruments – the second wave). While these strategies have become common in natural resource settings (forest certification and organic farming, for example), they are less familiar in a pollution control context. Yet the number of applications in that context is now growing in both OECD and developing countries. This survey will review what we know and don’t know about the use of disclosure strategies to control pollution and conclude with the author's sense of where further research would be particularly helpful.

Journal

Environmental and Resource EconomicsSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 23, 2004

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