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Determining the temperature of an opaque object by its thermal radiation spectrum: forms of initial data presentation and methods

Determining the temperature of an opaque object by its thermal radiation spectrum: forms of... Abstract Spectral distributions of intensities, relative emissivity, and inverse radiance temperatures of an opaque, free-radiating object in a condensed state are used as the initial data. The methods of determining the thermodynamic (true) temperature corresponding to these distributions, when object emissivity is previously unknown, are considered. The advantages and disadvantages of each method and corresponding form of an initial data presentation are discussed. It is shown that the spectral distribution of inverse radiance temperatures gives the greatest information about the true temperature and emissivity of the measured object. The estimates of the temperature range to which the true temperature belongs are given based on the known experimental data for tungsten. The methods for additional verification of reliability of the obtained results are presented. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Thermophysics and Aeromechanics Springer Journals

Determining the temperature of an opaque object by its thermal radiation spectrum: forms of initial data presentation and methods

Thermophysics and Aeromechanics , Volume 25 (4): 16 – Jul 1, 2018

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
2018 Kutateladze Institute of Thermophysics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences
ISSN
0869-8643
eISSN
1531-8699
DOI
10.1134/S0869864318040078
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Spectral distributions of intensities, relative emissivity, and inverse radiance temperatures of an opaque, free-radiating object in a condensed state are used as the initial data. The methods of determining the thermodynamic (true) temperature corresponding to these distributions, when object emissivity is previously unknown, are considered. The advantages and disadvantages of each method and corresponding form of an initial data presentation are discussed. It is shown that the spectral distribution of inverse radiance temperatures gives the greatest information about the true temperature and emissivity of the measured object. The estimates of the temperature range to which the true temperature belongs are given based on the known experimental data for tungsten. The methods for additional verification of reliability of the obtained results are presented.

Journal

Thermophysics and AeromechanicsSpringer Journals

Published: Jul 1, 2018

References