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Determination of volumetric changes in cracked expansive clays

Determination of volumetric changes in cracked expansive clays The main objective of this research was to determine volumetric changes in cracked expansive clays. The presence of soil discontinuities was captured by using appropriate soil property functions, namely: a bimodal water retention curve and a sigmoidal swell–shrink curve. Field measurements were used in empirical equations to predict volume changes, and the results were validated using published data (laboratory testing, numerical modeling, or site monitoring). The results indicated that the average swell potential and swell pressure of the expansive Regina clay are 18 ± 2% and 155 ± 15 kPa, respectively. Likewise, heave was found to be 20–30 mm at surface and gradually diminished at 1.75 m depth. The predicted results closely matched the ranges and trends as validated using published data of laboratory testing, numerical modeling, or site monitoring. It is concluded that for natural and compacted expansive soils, the bimodal water retention curve differentiates between flow through the cracks and through the soil matrix. Likewise, the proposed sigmoidal equation accurately describes the swell–shrink curve with most of the deformations between the shrinkage limit and the crack limit. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Innovative Infrastructure Solutions Springer Journals

Determination of volumetric changes in cracked expansive clays

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020
ISSN
2364-4176
eISSN
2364-4184
DOI
10.1007/s41062-020-00358-z
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The main objective of this research was to determine volumetric changes in cracked expansive clays. The presence of soil discontinuities was captured by using appropriate soil property functions, namely: a bimodal water retention curve and a sigmoidal swell–shrink curve. Field measurements were used in empirical equations to predict volume changes, and the results were validated using published data (laboratory testing, numerical modeling, or site monitoring). The results indicated that the average swell potential and swell pressure of the expansive Regina clay are 18 ± 2% and 155 ± 15 kPa, respectively. Likewise, heave was found to be 20–30 mm at surface and gradually diminished at 1.75 m depth. The predicted results closely matched the ranges and trends as validated using published data of laboratory testing, numerical modeling, or site monitoring. It is concluded that for natural and compacted expansive soils, the bimodal water retention curve differentiates between flow through the cracks and through the soil matrix. Likewise, the proposed sigmoidal equation accurately describes the swell–shrink curve with most of the deformations between the shrinkage limit and the crack limit.

Journal

Innovative Infrastructure SolutionsSpringer Journals

Published: Aug 28, 2020

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