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Cultural Resource Management in Context

Cultural Resource Management in Context In the United States, much of historic preservation is carried out in a framework of cultural resource management. Cultural resource management is increasingly being conducted as heritage management in the larger context of ecosystem management or ecological stewardship. Cultural resources are an important factor in the human environment, and must be managed in the context of all other biological, social, and geophysical elements in that environment or ecosystem. Good environmental stewardship requires affirmative resource management, including management of our tangible and intangible cultural resources. Many scientists are involved in cultural resource management, either directly or indirectly and either consciously or unconsciously. There is increased public awareness of the value of cultural resources, and their protection involves the knowledgeable and caring collaboration of resource specialists (e.g., anthropologists, archaeologists, architects, archivists, engineers, folklorists, historians), material scientists, decision-making land managers, and the living community with ties to the heritage resources. This in turn involves each participating community and individual (including the scientists) managing the interfaces among themselves. This is done by learning something about (and learning to appreciate) other groups' values and special languages and their operating constraints and opportunities, and about the overall public benefits and costs of cultural resource management decisions. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives and Museum Informatics Springer Journals

Cultural Resource Management in Context

Archives and Museum Informatics , Volume 13 (4) – Sep 29, 2004

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Computer Science; Data Structures, Cryptology and Information Theory; Document Preparation and Text Processing; Management of Computing and Information Systems; Library Science; Arts
ISSN
1042-1467
eISSN
1573-7500
DOI
10.1023/A:1012480729171
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In the United States, much of historic preservation is carried out in a framework of cultural resource management. Cultural resource management is increasingly being conducted as heritage management in the larger context of ecosystem management or ecological stewardship. Cultural resources are an important factor in the human environment, and must be managed in the context of all other biological, social, and geophysical elements in that environment or ecosystem. Good environmental stewardship requires affirmative resource management, including management of our tangible and intangible cultural resources. Many scientists are involved in cultural resource management, either directly or indirectly and either consciously or unconsciously. There is increased public awareness of the value of cultural resources, and their protection involves the knowledgeable and caring collaboration of resource specialists (e.g., anthropologists, archaeologists, architects, archivists, engineers, folklorists, historians), material scientists, decision-making land managers, and the living community with ties to the heritage resources. This in turn involves each participating community and individual (including the scientists) managing the interfaces among themselves. This is done by learning something about (and learning to appreciate) other groups' values and special languages and their operating constraints and opportunities, and about the overall public benefits and costs of cultural resource management decisions.

Journal

Archives and Museum InformaticsSpringer Journals

Published: Sep 29, 2004

References