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Cultivating openness in the therapeutic relationship

Cultivating openness in the therapeutic relationship The American Journal of Psychoanalysis, Vol. 50, No. 2, 1990 CULTIVATING OPENNESS IN THE THERAPEUTIC RELATIONSHIP Meryl F. Brown One year ago, I felt emotionally detached from the tragedy of AIDS. ~ For me, AIDS was a terrible problem that happened to someone else. My experi- ence changed in the spring of 1987 when Peter, a 40-year-old man who I am treating, was diagnosed as having AIDS-related complex, 2 better known as ARC. Peter responded to this crisis by expressing a great deal of anxiety, anger, resistance, and denial. He felt alone and stoically idealized his isolation as "unbound" self-sufficiency. The disease called into question his resigned solution. Here was the possibility of death, the ultimate freedom from the world. He wondered whether that was what he truly wanted. He struggled with the possible alternative, being alive. Both Peter and I tried to absorb the rapid transformation that unfolded in his life. The language in the therapeutic hour changed. New words came into his conversation: T-cells, skin cancer, thrush, pneumonia, fungal infections, boils, AL721, dapsone, AZT, DTC, nausea, fatigue, blood tests, doctors, money, health insurance, death. I felt overwhelmed and had difficulty opening to the changes in the therapeutic http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The American Journal of Psychoanalysis Springer Journals

Cultivating openness in the therapeutic relationship

The American Journal of Psychoanalysis , Volume 50 (2): 12 – Jun 1, 1990

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
1990 Association for the Advancement of Psychoanalysis
ISSN
0002-9548
eISSN
1573-6741
DOI
10.1007/BF01250908
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The American Journal of Psychoanalysis, Vol. 50, No. 2, 1990 CULTIVATING OPENNESS IN THE THERAPEUTIC RELATIONSHIP Meryl F. Brown One year ago, I felt emotionally detached from the tragedy of AIDS. ~ For me, AIDS was a terrible problem that happened to someone else. My experi- ence changed in the spring of 1987 when Peter, a 40-year-old man who I am treating, was diagnosed as having AIDS-related complex, 2 better known as ARC. Peter responded to this crisis by expressing a great deal of anxiety, anger, resistance, and denial. He felt alone and stoically idealized his isolation as "unbound" self-sufficiency. The disease called into question his resigned solution. Here was the possibility of death, the ultimate freedom from the world. He wondered whether that was what he truly wanted. He struggled with the possible alternative, being alive. Both Peter and I tried to absorb the rapid transformation that unfolded in his life. The language in the therapeutic hour changed. New words came into his conversation: T-cells, skin cancer, thrush, pneumonia, fungal infections, boils, AL721, dapsone, AZT, DTC, nausea, fatigue, blood tests, doctors, money, health insurance, death. I felt overwhelmed and had difficulty opening to the changes in the therapeutic

Journal

The American Journal of PsychoanalysisSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 1, 1990

Keywords: Clinical Psychology; Psychotherapy; Psychoanalysis

References