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Criminal Sentencing and Intelligent Decision Support

Criminal Sentencing and Intelligent Decision Support 152 URI J. SCHILD it could also involve an expert knowledge-base. Information would be retrieved by the system through an intelligent reasoning process. But the final decision would be made by the judge himself. The construction of such a system is also a major challenge. It is our goal to discuss what kind of support a computer system can give to a judge with respect to the sentencing process. We shall consider what other researchers have done on this subject, and also describe our own work. We shall make a distinction between non- intelligent computer systems, which are essentially statistical or criminological in nature, and expert systems, i.e., systems which exhibit intelligence of their own. The concept of an expert system does not have an exact definition anymore (if it ever had one). We shall call the kind of system that passes sentence on its own, an expert system, while the kind of system we are interested in could be called an intelligent advisory system. The discussion of our problem is also relevant to similar problems in other areas. Determination of amounts of child support and alimony, or calculation of reparations for physical injuries are problems where human discretion http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Artificial Intelligence and Law Springer Journals

Criminal Sentencing and Intelligent Decision Support

Artificial Intelligence and Law , Volume 6 (4) – Oct 16, 2004

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Computer Science; Artificial Intelligence (incl. Robotics); International IT and Media Law, Intellectual Property Law; Philosophy of Law; Legal Aspects of Computing; Information Storage and Retrieval
ISSN
0924-8463
eISSN
1572-8382
DOI
10.1023/A:1008236719573
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

152 URI J. SCHILD it could also involve an expert knowledge-base. Information would be retrieved by the system through an intelligent reasoning process. But the final decision would be made by the judge himself. The construction of such a system is also a major challenge. It is our goal to discuss what kind of support a computer system can give to a judge with respect to the sentencing process. We shall consider what other researchers have done on this subject, and also describe our own work. We shall make a distinction between non- intelligent computer systems, which are essentially statistical or criminological in nature, and expert systems, i.e., systems which exhibit intelligence of their own. The concept of an expert system does not have an exact definition anymore (if it ever had one). We shall call the kind of system that passes sentence on its own, an expert system, while the kind of system we are interested in could be called an intelligent advisory system. The discussion of our problem is also relevant to similar problems in other areas. Determination of amounts of child support and alimony, or calculation of reparations for physical injuries are problems where human discretion

Journal

Artificial Intelligence and LawSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 16, 2004

References