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Conservation Strategies for the Traditional Water Systems: A Case of Almora City, Uttarakhand

Conservation Strategies for the Traditional Water Systems: A Case of Almora City, Uttarakhand It is essential to understand how culture, geography, and environment interact to create water systems that have sustained communities for years in hilly terrains of the globe. In India, Almora, Uttarakhand, is one such example where Naula and Dhara’s traditional water harvesting systems still persist as a consistent source of fresh drinking water. These systems are valuable due to historical, religious, and architectural importance as they exhibit ancient knowledge about architecture and hydraulics in hills. However, unplanned development and a decline in associated knowledge systems have damaged Naulas and their structures in the city. This paper aims to assess the Naulas in the Almora hill city and propose strategies for conserving traditional water sources and protecting their structures. A comprehensive survey of traditional water sources is carried out based on field surveys for resource mapping, inventories, documentation, visual inspection, and unstructured interviews with local historians and stakeholders. The findings are validated through analysis and condition assessment using non-destructive techniques. The study’s findings indicate that numerous barriers exist to integrating traditional water sources into the current water management system due to lack of expertise and training, persistent conflict and competition between conservation needs and developers’ interests, and lack of funding. There is an immediate need to protect and preserve these traditional water systems and elevate their neglected status to sustain freshwater resources along with associated knowledge systems as a valuable resource for sustainable and inclusive development. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of The Institution of Engineers (India) Series A Springer Journals

Conservation Strategies for the Traditional Water Systems: A Case of Almora City, Uttarakhand

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References (20)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © The Institution of Engineers (India) 2023. Springer Nature or its licensor (e.g. a society or other partner) holds exclusive rights to this article under a publishing agreement with the author(s) or other rightsholder(s); author self-archiving of the accepted manuscript version of this article is solely governed by the terms of such publishing agreement and applicable law.
ISSN
2250-2149
eISSN
2250-2157
DOI
10.1007/s40030-023-00759-0
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

It is essential to understand how culture, geography, and environment interact to create water systems that have sustained communities for years in hilly terrains of the globe. In India, Almora, Uttarakhand, is one such example where Naula and Dhara’s traditional water harvesting systems still persist as a consistent source of fresh drinking water. These systems are valuable due to historical, religious, and architectural importance as they exhibit ancient knowledge about architecture and hydraulics in hills. However, unplanned development and a decline in associated knowledge systems have damaged Naulas and their structures in the city. This paper aims to assess the Naulas in the Almora hill city and propose strategies for conserving traditional water sources and protecting their structures. A comprehensive survey of traditional water sources is carried out based on field surveys for resource mapping, inventories, documentation, visual inspection, and unstructured interviews with local historians and stakeholders. The findings are validated through analysis and condition assessment using non-destructive techniques. The study’s findings indicate that numerous barriers exist to integrating traditional water sources into the current water management system due to lack of expertise and training, persistent conflict and competition between conservation needs and developers’ interests, and lack of funding. There is an immediate need to protect and preserve these traditional water systems and elevate their neglected status to sustain freshwater resources along with associated knowledge systems as a valuable resource for sustainable and inclusive development.

Journal

Journal of The Institution of Engineers (India) Series ASpringer Journals

Published: Dec 1, 2023

Keywords: Conservation; Naulas; Indian hill city; Traditional knowledge systems; Sustainable; Freshwater; Mountain

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