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Conservation of Cultural Materials from Underwater Sites

Conservation of Cultural Materials from Underwater Sites Underwater archaeology is the only branch of field archaeology that is dependent upon the conservation laboratory for its ultimate success. In fact, in underwater archaeology the activities of the conservation laboratory are considered to be a continuation of the field excavations with the recording of basic data along with the stabilization, preservation, and study of the recovered material being major objectives. Commonly used procedures for conserving ceramics, glass, bone, ivory, wood, leather, and the various metals are discussed. Observation and insights are presented on the applicability of the different processes for conserving various materials. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives and Museum Informatics Springer Journals

Conservation of Cultural Materials from Underwater Sites

Archives and Museum Informatics , Volume 13 (4) – Sep 29, 2004

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Computer Science; Data Structures, Cryptology and Information Theory; Document Preparation and Text Processing; Management of Computing and Information Systems; Library Science; Arts
ISSN
1042-1467
eISSN
1573-7500
DOI
10.1023/A:1012420510516
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Underwater archaeology is the only branch of field archaeology that is dependent upon the conservation laboratory for its ultimate success. In fact, in underwater archaeology the activities of the conservation laboratory are considered to be a continuation of the field excavations with the recording of basic data along with the stabilization, preservation, and study of the recovered material being major objectives. Commonly used procedures for conserving ceramics, glass, bone, ivory, wood, leather, and the various metals are discussed. Observation and insights are presented on the applicability of the different processes for conserving various materials.

Journal

Archives and Museum InformaticsSpringer Journals

Published: Sep 29, 2004

References